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Only in recent years did I decide to test the main higher end portable offerings from Tecsun: the PL-660/680, and PL-880. electricity kwh cost calculator What I discovered, as have most people who own the Tecsuns, and similar receivers such as the XHDATA D-808, are the wonders of DSP chips and the great flexibility they provide, such as multiple selectivity options, along with excellent sensitivity.

I used the S-8800 in a number of physical locations, from public parks where I hoped to avoid high noise levels, to my back yard where noise levels are, unfortunately, quite high. I have compared the S-8800 to a number of portables in my collection, including: SONY ICF-2010, SW-77, SW-55, along with Tecsun†s 660 and 880, Grundig SAT-500. Audio

Widely used in a number of radios these days, the S-8800 uses a DSP chip that is seen in a number of other receivers. The best description I have seen so far is in the review by Jay Allen who notes that Tecsun “decided to utilize a combination of DSP (Digital Signal Processing) circuits along with traditional analog circuits . . .most of the AM/SW circuitry is PLL/analog along with the 1st and 2nd IF†s, while the 3rd IF is DSP.” It appears that after a bit of a rocky period in the beginning when initial units suffered from images and birdies, Tecsun got it right. Ergonomics

Tecsun hit it out the ballpark with the remote supplied with the S-8800. It looks like something you would find with high end stereo equipment and clearly much thought went into making sure it can control every aspect of the receiver, from SW band slewing to selectivity, volume, readout — everything except BASS and TREBLE control, Timer/Alarm, and master volume (i.e. as other reviewers note, you have to set the on-radio master volume to a high enough level first, then use the remote to vary). Power

The radio requires two 18650 lithium (Li-ion) rechargeable batteries, with individual indicator LEDS inside the battery compartment. gas bijoux nolita This choice is perhaps one of the most controversial aspects of the 8800. Among other things, 18650s usually receive more attention from airport security personnel if one is taking the radio on a trip — this is something everryone should keep in mind. Any radio being transported on a flight these days is going to be subjected to added scrutiny, simply because almost no one uses radios anymore.

As for the power needs of the receiver, the 18650s seem to do a good job and last quite a long time, even days. Included in the box is one of those white USB charger blocks — quite small and convenient. I usuually travel with separate 18650 chargers, the kind used with high end flashlights, so having spare sets of charged batteries is not a problem. But if both 18650†s in the Tecsun are drained, the radio definitely needs to re-charge to a minimum level required for operation.

As I write this, I plugged the S-8800 into a wall outlet (a blue LED indicator on front indicates charging mode) and I was unable to use the radio as the battery level had completely zeroed out. Also keep in mind that the USB charging brick throws off EMI to other radios in the vicinity, and makes it impossible to use the S-8800 itself — there is just too much interference from the charging process to the radio†s receiving circuitry. Comparisons

As mentioned, I compared the S-8800 with a number of other portables in my collection. ideal gas kinetic energy Each of these other radios, including the classics from SONY such as the SW-55 or SW77 have their strengths. For example, the SW77 has the best implemented synchronous reception of any portable since the ICF-2010 along with superb sensitivity. However, even the large speaker on the SW-77 was unable to compete with the S-8800. Only radios such as the older Grundig SAT 500/700 had the advantage when compared to the S-8800†s speaker, with the Tecsun PL-8800 close behind. gas prices going up Receiving Comparisons

In intensive use over the years, I have concluded that the Panasonic RF-B65 is probably among the hottest small portables. With its famous amplified whip antenna, the 65 time after time succeeds in allowing me to hear stations that other portables struggle with ( see this 3 radio comparison I posted a few years ago in which the B65 outguns the Sangean 909X and SONY SW-07).

As shown in the video, the Panasonic was able to distinguish more clearly between a station on 9,650 kHz (Guinea) and a station 5 kHz above (in this case, Algeria via France, using 9,655 kHz) than the Tecsun, which seemed to struggle. Indeed, at one point I was forced to attempt ECSS (Exalted Carrier SSB) mode to separate the two stations, whereas on the Panasonic, being the older and simpler radio design was an advantage in that the RF-B65 was actually able to more clearly separate the two stations by “de-tuning” from the center frequency.

One huge advantage of the S-8800 by the way is that there is a hidden software change that enables one to adjust SSB zero beat to zero or near zero. This means that in theory using LSB/USB to improve reception is possible, though keep in mind that there may be some variation from unit to unit. So far, after performing the so-called ‘secret†fix (among a list of tweaks discovered so far) my particular S-8800 appears to be able to zero beat LSB/USB with little or no variation between the side bands, pretty much up and down the SW bands. Conclusions

For me, the S-8800 has turned out to be the biggest surprise of the last several years. Coming seemingly out of nowhere, packaged in the cabinet of a receiver that was seen as mediocre at best, we have a triple conversion beauty (it seems to weigh almost nothing by the way) that provides pretty much every tool required these days to tackle what is left of shortwave broadcast reception. It has superior audio, unless one compares to older Grundig and similar sets.

Drawbacks are quite few to be honest. o goshi judo A case can definitely be made that using 18650 batteries was a poor choice by Tecsun. This means, for example, that if you†re out on the beach or elsewhere for many hours, the only way to charge up the radio would be to use a separate phone battery charger rather than simply be able to slip in regular alkalines. But then, I carry separate battery charge units already for my phone.

The big criticism that synchronous reception could have been included is also valid. The same was said about the SONY ICF-SW55 — withh synchronous reception, and a bit more careful design of the tuning circuit, that radio could have been a heavier hitter, a mini-ICF 2010, something the much more expensive SW-77 was designed to improve upon.

However, so far radios utilizing DSP chips have struggled when it comes to synchronous reception capability. Indeed, the feature has ended up being discovered only as one of a number of ‘secret†features. Only the PL-660 has a decent synchronous feature, but that radio is hobbled by limited selectivity options, while sync on the PL-880 is pretty much useless.

From a performance perspective, if you are like me, a die-hard DX†er at heart who gets a kick out of searching for the last Peruvians on the air, the S-8800 should be more than sufficient. grade 9 electricity unit test answers If you†re both a die-hard DX†er and enjoy FM and AM, the 8800 should also be a perfect selection, since it†s been reviewed quite well in terms of medium wave and FM capability.

[I want to express sincere thanks to Anna at Anon-co who responded quickly when I proposed a review of the S-8800 and supplied the receiver on which this article is based. Anna was patient as my original plan to have a review in by September was delayed by unavoidable personal matters. Thanks also to Tom Witherspoon for getting the review up so quickly].

Digital Alert Systems/Monroe Electronics, the global leader in emergency communications solutions for video services providers, today announced that it has partnered with DigIt Signage Technologies to interface the ChyTV HD-EAS, a version of the ChyTV video graphics system for television, information displays, and digital signage, with the DASDEC series of Emergency Alert System/Common Alerting Protocol (EAS/CAP) flexible emergency communications devices. The integration brings the marketplace a better, lower-cost solution for creating selective, high-quality crawls for EAS alerts on standard- and high-definition (SD and HD) channels.

LYNDONVILLE, N.Y. — Nov. 14, 2018 — DigDigital Alert Systems/Monroe Electronics, the global leader in emergency communications solutions for video services providers, today announced that it has partnered with DigIt Signage Technologies to interface the ChyTV HD-EAS, a version of the ChyTV video graphics system for television, information displays, and digital signage, with the DASDEC series of Emergency Alert System/Common Alerting Protocol (EAS/CAP) flexible emergency communications devices. The integration brings the marketplace a better, lower-cost solution for creating selective, high-quality crawls for EAS alerts on standard- and high-definition (SD and HD) channels.

“Digital Alert Systems has always looked for ways to help customers comply with FCC rules on EAS/CAP while making the presentation of this information as clean and palatable as possible. Working with ChyTV not only achieves this goal but does so at price points not available until now,” said Bill Robertson, vice president of business development for Digital Alert Systems. “With the ChyTV HD-EAS, our combined customers can achieve full FCC EAS/CAP compliance with an improved presentation across multiple program streams for far less money than they could with separate pieces or competing solutions. The ease of wiring and configuration is a further benefit over a menagerie of separate components.”

The ability to place the visual text of an EAS message over programming and switch the audio is an FCC requirement under Part 11 rules. electricity usage While there are several ways to accomplish this task, the least disruptive for the viewer is to use a crawl generator and audio switch. In the past, when using HD-SDI with embedded audio signals, the process might have required several pieces of equipment — HD character generator, de-embedder, audio swwitch, and embedder. The process isn†t necessarily onerous for a single program stream, but it becomes complex and expensive when dealing with multiple program streams.

The ChyTV HD-EAS system combines all the components necessary for handling a single program stream into one chassis, with simple connections from the DASDEC, which can feed signals to up to eight different ChyTV units. static electricity in water Since the per-stream cost is significantly lower than ever before, stations having used full-screen interrupts for EAS in the past now have a viable option for considerably improving the viewer experience. The system supports both SD and HD formats, giving stations currently in SD a seamless upgrade path to HD without the need to purchase additional equipment to comply with EAS rules.

“One of the strengths of the ChyTV product line is the ability to perform broadcast-quality character generation derived from decades of television-graphics product development and experience,” said Vinny Biondolillo, director of ChyTV sales support for DigIt Signage Technologies. “Tight integration with an EAS system such as DASDEC is a natural fit and opens up new sales channels for both companies.”

ChyTV HD-EAS devices are available in two models: a 3-RU rack-mount chassis with redundant power supplies (part No. 7A0-0349-RK, $6,395) and a desktop PC chassis with a single power supply (part No. 7A0-0349-D, $5,995). Both models come with a GPI I/F module and CG software. Multiple-unit discounts are available. The DASDEC requires the TV-Plus package or either the MultiStation-2 or MultiStation-5 option installed.

Digital Alert Systems is the leading innovator of next-generation Common Alerting Protocol (CAP) and Emergency Alert Systems (EAS) for radio and television broadcasters. In 2009, Digital Alert Systems merged with Monroe Electronics, whose EAS products are the widely accepted standard for CATV. From its headquarters in Lyndonville, New York, Digital Alert Systems provides R&D, manufacturing, sales, and customer service for all Digital Alert Systems, Monroe Electronics, and One-Net brands and maintains its hard-earned reputation for quality, reliability, and service to valued customers around the world.