Electric cars railuk forums z gas el salvador precios

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Click to expand…Wheels driven exclusively by the electric motors isn’t particularly common (and is known as a P4 hybrid). I’m most aware of it through the the various Le Mans Prototypes (hybrids) which are typically ICE driven rear wheels with electric motors driving the front wheels, but in terms of road vehicles, it’s only really seen in high end vehicles, like the NSX and i8, where it provides some level of All Wheel Drive. Most hybrid architectures have the motor on the ‘driving’ side of the transmission, either in series with the engine (P2) or parallel to (PS) the engine, but in either case usually requiring a number of clutches and control systems to optimise when the electric motor is used and when the ICE is used. Needless to say that this means that manual gearboxes aren’t really practical for most hybrid vehicles – indeed the only cases where you could feasibly get a manual gearbox are for the P1 architecture (electric motor permanently coupled to and in line with the crankshaft), and P0 architecture (belt connected motor on the ancillaries side of the engine, allowing you to slightly boost the engine but mainly remove ancillary loads such as air con and power steering), neither of which are as efficient as the more common P2 and PS architectures, although P0 is cheap and easy.

But coming back to the original point, as alluded to in other posts electric motors have so much low end torque, and generally so much more powerful than ICEs that you don’t necessarily need a gearbox. All Formula e cars have moved away from the 5 speed gearboxes that they had in the first season to 1 (2/9 powertrains), 2 (5/9 powertrains), or 3 (2/9 powertrains) speed gearboxes. For the two speed teams, they have one gear for getting off the line, and then one for everything else apart from the tightest hairpins where you come to a near halt.

The last time I went to visit the place I used to live (65 miles away) I parked in a public car park for £1 and there was a fast (250 minutes*) charger, completely free, no card, no scheme, no nothing, just plug in and charge – and left the car there while I visited. Actual time cost/lost – a few seconds plugging and unplugging.

In a nearby town, there is a free unencumbered fast (250 minutes*) charger in a municipal car park where it costs £1.50 for two hours but you can stay for 2 hours free if you are charging. In that case one might even argue that 2 hours charge costs minus £1.50.

A couple of weeks ago, I drove ~40 miles to Ikea in Leeds. Plugged in when I got there. Free rapid (30 minutes*) charger (**). Called at Costco in Leeds and then headed back to that nearby town, plugged in while I went into town for some shopping and lunch. Left full, free, having travelled ~80 miles for zero fuel cost.

I do in fact have Polar Plus (which opens up a vast further array, many of which are free to Plus users). I genuinely don’t pay for it. By which I mean – I took out an EV package energy deal with my supplier where (a) my tariff costs went DOWN from the previous tariff AND (b) they include Polar Plus membership.

** In fact the rapid charger at Ikea is supposed to be chargeable (via a mobile app) and then Ikea give a refund when you shop and show the e-receipt. However on this occasion the machine was operating on free vend – just plug and go. Either way, it would be a free charge as the purpose of my visit was to shop there.

Click to expand…I see entirely why you’d say that. I’ll only counter it by saying that it (in part, probably) comes from the ICE mindset that filling up is a separate activity that you do when you need to, and you stand and watch while it does it. We’ve all been doing that for eons and its a mindset it takes some effort to break.

The upmarket EVs (such as Teslas) will go upwards of 300 miles – or 5 hours (say) on a charge. The adjusted mindset one needs to adopt is to acknowledge that in all probability one will need to stop anyway on a journey in excess of 300 miles; and that what you do is charge whilst you were going to be stopped anyway – having a leak, a cuppa, snack, lunch, whatever; and that in so doing, the 30 minutes or more you spend charging is not a lost 30 minutes; you charge in parallel with another activity. The other thing you do is take every such opportunity. You almost never stop and park at a location with an available charger, and don’t use it. Because a top-up will save time at the next stop……

The last time I went to visit the place I used to live (65 miles away) I parked in a public car park for £1 and there was a fast (250 minutes*) charger, completely free, no card, no scheme, no nothing, just plug in and charge – and left the car there while I visited. Actual time cost/lost – a few seconds plugging and unplugging.

In a nearby town, there is a free unencumbered fast (250 minutes*) charger in a municipal car park where it costs £1.50 for two hours but you can stay for 2 hours free if you are charging. In that case one might even argue that 2 hours charge costs minus £1.50.

A couple of weeks ago, I drove ~40 miles to Ikea in Leeds. Plugged in when I got there. Free rapid (30 minutes*) charger (**). Called at Costco in Leeds and then headed back to that nearby town, plugged in while I went into town for some shopping and lunch. Left full, free, having travelled ~80 miles for zero fuel cost.

I do in fact have Polar Plus (which opens up a vast further array, many of which are free to Plus users). I genuinely don’t pay for it. By which I mean – I took out an EV package energy deal with my supplier where (a) my tariff costs went DOWN from the previous tariff AND (b) they include Polar Plus membership.

** In fact the rapid charger at Ikea is supposed to be chargeable (via a mobile app) and then Ikea give a refund when you shop and show the e-receipt. However on this occasion the machine was operating on free vend – just plug and go. Either way, it would be a free charge as the purpose of my visit was to shop there.