Etiology of lower gastrointestinal bleeding in adults mp electricity bill payment online bhopal

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Lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) refers to blood loss of recent onset originating from a site distal to the ligament of Treitz [ 1]. It is usually suspected when patients complain of hematochezia (passage of maroon or bright red blood or blood clots per rectum). This is different from the clinical presentation of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, which includes hematemesis (vomiting of blood or coffee-ground-like material) and/or melena (black, tarry stools). Although helpful, the distinctions based upon stool chapter 7 electricity color are not absolute since melena can be seen with GI bleeding from the right colon (or small intestine), and hematochezia can be seen with massive upper GI bleeding [ 2-4]. Therefore, it is imperative to exclude a massive upper GI bleed in hemodynamically unstable patients presenting with hematochezia [ 5]. A nasogastric tube lavage that yields blood or coffee-ground-like material confirms the diagnosis of upper GI bleeding electricity storage costs; however, lavage may not be positive if bleeding has ceased or arises beyond a closed pylorus. (See Approach to acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in adults.)

This topic review will focus on the major causes of LGIB originating from the colon and briefly summarize the management of some of these disorders. Although the definition of LGIB includes small bowel sources, the clinical presentation, management, and outcomes of small bowel bleeding are generally distinct from bleeding from colon sources [ 8]. The diagnostic approach to patients with LGIB, suspected small gas bloating nausea bowel bleeding, and occult gastrointestinal bleeding are discussed separately. (See Approach to acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding in adults and Evaluation of occult gastrointestinal bleeding and Evaluation of suspected small bowel bleeding (formerly obscure gastrointestinal bleeding).)

Lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB electricity icons free) refers to blood loss of recent onset originating from a site distal to the ligament of Treitz [ 1]. It is usually suspected when patients complain of hematochezia (passage of maroon or bright red blood or blood clots per rectum). This is different from the clinical presentation of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, which includes hematemesis (vomiting of blood or coffee-ground-like material) and/or melena (black, tarry stools). Although helpful, the distinctions based upon stool color are not absolute since melena can be seen with GI bleeding from the right colon (or small intestine), and hematochezia can be seen with massive upper GI bleeding [ 2-4]. Therefore, it is imperative to exclude a massive upper GI bleed in hemodynamically unstable patients presenting with youtube electricity hematochezia [ 5]. A nasogastric tube lavage that yields blood or coffee-ground-like material confirms the diagnosis of upper GI bleeding; however, lavage may not be positive if bleeding has ceased or arises beyond a closed pylorus. (See Approach to acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in adults.)

This topic review will focus on the major causes of LGIB originating from the colon and briefly summarize the management of some of these disorders. Although the definition of LGIB includes small bowel sources, the clinical presentation, management, and outcomes of small bowel bleeding are generally distinct from bleeding from colon sources [ 8]. The diagnostic approach to patients with LGIB, suspected small bowel bleeding, and occult gastrointestinal bleeding are discussed separately. (See Approach to acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding in adults electricity physics definition and Evaluation of occult gastrointestinal bleeding and Evaluation of suspected small bowel bleeding (formerly obscure gastrointestinal bleeding).)