Evita electricity manipulation

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There is a neighbourhood in Buenos Aires shaped like her head. Her embalmed corpse was kept in the dining room of the house of her husband, Juan, something that was, strangely enough, the idea of his next wife, Isabel. Hmm. When it was discovered after being missing for 16 years, the Argentine government took special measures to ensure it wouldn’t go missing again. Her tomb, therefore, contains a trap door and a trap door under that trap door… oh, and it’s built to survive a nuclear attack. speedy q gas station All together making this particular tomb sound like a set from an Indiana Jones movie…

Eva María Duarte de Perón was born in Los Toldos, Argentina, on May 7 th, 1919 or 1922. She’s a woman many will know the name of… but do you know anything about her? I knew nothing, yet, in Argentina, she is revered as a saint. She spent her childhood in Junín, living with her parents Juana and Juan. Oh, that’s not confusing at all. Juan only spent half his week with Juana and Eva, spending the other half in Chivilcoy. With his other wife. And family. Oh, they knew about each other. Back then, it was so common for a man to have multiple families and wives it was expected. If a man who does that sounds like a bit of a dick, he did end up leaving Juana and Eva for his other family. Tool.

Juana and Eva were forced to move to the poorest area of Junín, living a life on the edge. It was a dusty village, a desolate wreck of abject poverty and untold misery. Juan was loaded, by the way. It wasn’t long before he died. In a scene straight from a soap opera, on the day of the funeral, his mistress, who he ran off with, turned up AT the funeral! That’s a bit… awkward.

Getting a bit of financial help, the family moved into a bigger home. Eva loved to perform in school plays and concerts, but her mother was desperate to marry her off to a local bachelor. Huh. But she dreamed of being an actress. At the age of 15, she decided to escape her poverty-ridden village, running off with a young musician. They had dreams and ambitions. Living in Buenos Aires, the big capital city. He was the one! Erm, bit of a damp squib, really. He wasn’t the one. It didn’t last very long. But Eva loved the city life. She wanted so much and she was determined to get it…

She had no formal education. electricity quiz ks3 She had no connections. She was all on her own. But she was a very talented actress and, in 1935, at the Comedias Theatre, she made her professional debut. Within a year, she was touring nationally with the theatre company, working as a model and even found herself in a couple of utterly woeful b-movies. She was soon noticed by Candilejas, a soap company, who, obviously, had a radio drama named Muy Bien. ‘Very Well’. Bit threatening, isn’t it?

On January 15 th, 1944, a massive earthquake rocked San Juan, killing over 10,000 people. Juan Perón (God, do they have any other names in Argentina?) was Secretary of Labour at the time. He decided to raise some money to help the victims, and one idea of his was to throw an ‘artistic festival’, where the country’s biggest and best stars would appear. A primitive benefit gig, if you will. At the gala on January 22 nd, Colonel Juan Perón was introduced to Eva Duarte. On January 23 rd, they woke up in bed together. Oh, yes. They wasted no time in getting down to ‘business’. She called the experience ‘marvellous’. I mean, I’d be thrilled with that review…

He was nearly 30 years older than Eva was, but that didn’t matter to her. She was an actress! And a busy young woman. An acting union had just been formed and Eva, well, she became its president. Despite having little interest in politics, she was a great admirer of Juan Perón, even producing radio dramas listing the great accomplishments of her lover. But political unrest was never far away.

The Grupo de Oficiales Unidos or GOU, nicknamed, rather menacingly, ‘The Colonels’, were not happy with Juan. He was gaining power and influence in the political circles of the day. His star was rising and nobody could stop it. Many believe Juan was the most powerful man in Argentine politics at the time. He was arrested in 1945 by people who feared that his support amongst the descamisados, the workers and the poor, might lead to a power grab…

350,000 people took to the streets to demand his release. Their wish was granted. He addressed the crowd that night, and soon he married his love, Eva Perón. She had remained devoted to him, even when he was in prison, something he said touched him deeply. The fires of power were burning inside and so, in 1946, Juan made a bid for the presidency.

Eva campaigned heavily for her husband, using her radio shows to deliver some of the most powerful speeches in political history. emitra electricity bill payment He was a man of the people, a man of the working classes. Eva knew what that was like. Together, they visited every inch of Argentina, something that offended the establishment. But the public? They loved her. They even dubbed her Evita, Spanish for Little Eva. Awww. Unsurprisingly, Juan Perón won the election…

Eva was invited to Spain in 1947 as First Lady, still just 25 or 28. The Spanish loved her, too. The country was reeling from the Spanish Civil War, leaving the country under a UN embargo. The poverty was so great that Eva handed out hundreds and hundreds of 100 peseta notes to the poor children of Spain. She was even awarded the Order of Isabella the Catholic, the highest award given by the Spanish government. gas variables pogil Ooh.

They loved her in France too, where she went next, promising Charles de Gaulle two shipments of wheat. Cool. Sadly, Eva wasn’t welcomed in Britain, something she considered a snub. Her trip to Rome didn’t end well and her trip to Switzerland ended even worse, with angry mobs pelting her car with stones. She was later pelted with tomatoes. Switzerland? Angry mobs in Switzerland? Switzerland. Really? Good God, the world’s gone mad…

Most of the charity work in Buenos Aires was conducted by the Society of Beneficence, whose leader was the First Lady. They didn’t like Eva at all and refused to accept her as their leader. She was so pissed off she broke away from the norm and founded the Eva Perón Foundation, costing some 10,000 pesos to set up. Within a few years, the foundation had assets in cash and goods in excess of three billion pesos. 14,000 workers. 6,000 construction workers. 26 priests. 400,000 shoes distributed every year, along with 50,000 sewing machines and 200,000 cooking pots. They gave out scholarships, built homes, hospitals and other charitable institutions, all under Eva’s watchful eye. Entire neighbourhoods were built, including the one that’s the shape of her head when viewed from above. For the first time ever in Argentine history, healthcare was equal for all. Eva… really knew how to get shit done, didn’t she?

For many, this is why she’s considered a saint. Every single day, she made an effort to meet with the poor and listen to their requests. She kissed them, placing her hands on their wounds, touching the leprous, kissing the syphilitic. Argentina is a Catholic nation, so when she touched the leprous and fulfilled the needs of the poor, for many, she took on the attributes of many of the Catholic saints….

But she was working overtime. She spent 22 hours a day at the foundation. Juan pleaded with her to take a rest but she wouldn’t. She was outraged at the poverty she saw. “Sometimes I have wished my insults were slaps or lashes,” she said. “I’ve wanted to hit people in the face to make them see, if only for a day, what I see each day I help the people.”

Her crusade against poverty was only the tip of the iceberg. electricity sound effect mp3 free download She campaigned heavily for women’s suffrage, something that became law in 1947. Eva wasn’t even 30 yet! Yet she’d already made one hell of a difference. In the public celebration, Juan signed the law granting women the right to vote, handing it to Eva, symbolically making it hers. Not for the first time today… awww.

She was a busy bee, soon creating the Female Peronist Party. By 1951, they had some 500,000 members and 3,600 headquarters across Argentina. She never called herself a feminist, but the impact she had on the lives of Argentine women was profound. She led an army of women into politics and, come the 1951 election, Juan Perón, thanks to his wife, won a second term as president with 63% of the vote…

She had declined his offer to run for Vice President. She wanted her husband’s name all over the history books, not hers. At a rally attended by some two million people, Eva was expected to put her name forward for Vice President, something the military said they would not stand for. The crowd chanted, “¡Evita, Vice Presidente!” Shyly, she shook her head. But the crowd would not be silenced. “¡Ahora, Evita, ahora!” they screamed. “Now, Evita, now!” But she never did. Some say she was pressured, Peronists say she was selfless, others say her health was faltering. And they were right. At the tender age of 32, Eva fainted in public and she was rushed into surgery. She was diagnosed with cervical cancer.

She continued to faint over the following months, suffering extreme weakness and bleeding. Her health was deteriorating, and through it all, she never told her husband. But he knew she wasn’t well and it broke his heart. She was everything to him. In a desperate attempt to save her life, she underwent a hysterectomy, a radical procedure at the time. There are also suggestions that she even had a prefrontal lobotomy to ‘relieve the pain, agitation and anxiety she suffered.’

Together, Eva and Juan rode through Buenos Aires in a parade on June 4 th, 1952. It was to celebrate his re-election, but Eva was gravely ill. She couldn’t stand without Juan’s support, even wearing a fur coat with a wire frame hidden inside to help her stand up. And still the crowds adored her. Soon, she was being called the ‘Spiritual Leader of the Nation’.

Movies were stopped. Patrons were asked to leave restaurants. All official activities were suspended for two days and crowds gathered in Buenos Aires. grade 9 electricity quiz As her body was moved the next day, eight people died in a crush so great were the crowds. In total, 2,000 people were rushed to hospital for injuries sustained in the crush, with thousands more treated on the streets. Thousands lined those streets, for dozens and dozens of blocks, to wait for many hours to see her body lying in state at the Ministry of Labour. Floral tributes erupted all over the city. She received an ornate state funeral, attended by some three million people, from her family to those she helped. Flowers were even thrown from balconies as her coffin was paraded through the city.

Her body was embalmed at the request of a grief-stricken husband. Plans were made to erect a memorial in her honour, a man representing the descamisados, projected to be larger than the Statue of Liberty. Her body was to be placed at the base, but before it was completed, Juan Perón was overthrown in a military coup in 1955. He fled the country, forced to leave Eva behind.

The new military dictatorship removed Eva’s body from display and for the next 16 years… well, it vanished. Eva and everything she stood for was outlawed. In 1971, it was revealed that her body had been buried in Milan, Italy. It was exhumed and flown to Spain by Juan, where he kept his embalmed beloved in his dining room. When his exile ended in 1973, he returned to Argentina and was re-elected for a third term. Wahoo. His new wife, Isabel, succeeded Juan when he died in office in 1974, becoming Argentina’s first female president and the first in the western hemisphere…

Isabel made sure to return Eva to Argentina, where, for a short time, her embalmed body was displayed alongside Juan. What a lovely gesture. Eva was later buried in a tomb in Buenos Aires. gas variables pogil packet answers To ensure its safety, the tomb’s marble floor was fitted with trap doors, underneath which are… more trap doors. Under that, Eva’s coffin. And the whole thing is designed to survive a nuclear attack. Wow.

What to make of Eva Perón? I think it’s safe to assume if you don’t live in South America you probably know very little. Maybe just the name, like me. But now? What an incredible person. I feel a bit ashamed I didn’t know all this. The first elected female President of Argentina, Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, said that women owe a debt to Eva for her ‘passion and combativeness.’ Whilst Tomás Eloy Martínez described Eva as ‘the Cinderella of the tango and the Sleeping Beauty of Latin America.’ Now that’s an obituary…

The religious overtones persist. Martínez said, “Latin American myths are more resistant than they seem to be. Not even the mass exodus of the Cuban raft people or the rapid decomposition and isolation of Fidel Castro’s regime have eroded the triumphal myth of Che Guevara,” who was also Argentine. “Che as well as Evita symbolise certain naïve, but effective, beliefs: the hope for a better world; a life sacrificed on the altar of the disinherited, the humiliated, the poor of the Earth. They are myths which somehow reproduce the image of Christ.”

She is a legend in Argentina. The anniversary of her death is celebrated and on the 50 th anniversary, a museum opened in her honour. John Balfour, the British Ambassador to Argentina during the Perón regime, said of Eva, “She was by any standard a very extraordinary woman; when you think of Argentina and indeed Latin America as a men dominated part of the world, there was this woman who was playing a very great role. And of course she aroused very different feelings… the oligarchs… hated her. They look upon her as a ruthless woman. The masses of the people on the other hand worshipped her. They looked upon her as a lady bountiful who was dispensing Manna from heaven.” Even today, she’s never really left the collective consciousness of Argentines, and that’s one hell of a legacy…