‘Fake news’ in russia state censorship elicits an outcry – csmonitor.com electricity out

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A package of new laws meant to crack down on “fake news” and signed this week by Vladimir Putin is stirring an outcry in Russia. Civil society activists, the Kremlin’s own rights council, and a rare street protest have all expressed deep alarm la gas prices 2016 at the prospect of bureaucrats being empowered to shut down any online content that rubs them the wrong way.

The Duma’s fake news law imposes huge fines k electric jobs for publishing any “untrue” report that creates a threat to life, health, public order, and almost any public institution. A second law enables officials to shut down any content that “shows obvious disrespect for society, the state, and official symbols of Russia, the Russian Constitution, or other agencies.”

Analysts say the laws passed by the Duma are only the electricity meme latest of many attempts to regulate online speech in Russia, most of which have failed to produce much impact in the past. “Like most Russian laws, they are not really meant to be used,” says Alexei Simonov, head of a press freedom gas city indiana police department watchdog. “They are warning signs. They draw the lines which people should not cross. It’s not clear how these new laws will change the situation.”

For good measure, the Duma passed a second law enabling officials to shut down gas weed any content containing “information expressed in an indecent form which insults human dignity and public morality and shows obvious disrespect for society, the state, and official symbols of Russia, the Russian Constitution, or other agencies that administer government power in Russia.”

Russian analysts say the laws passed by the Duma are only the latest in a long line of attempts to regulate online speech in Russia, most of which have failed to produce gas vs diesel engine much impact in the past. If nothing else, some say, the new laws clarify the battle lines over free electricity for beginners pdf speech in ways that might prove productive in the long run. Let the people decide

“The day after Duma deputies passed the bill on fake news, we decided to do an experiment,” says Mr. Fomintsev. “We sent an official request to the Duma speaker, Vyacheslav Volodin, asking whether the phrase ‘Christ has risen’ could be regarded as fake news or not? His office responded, saying that’s not a question for the Duma 100 gas vs 10 ethanol to decide. But, in fact, under this new law, it really is.

The new Russian laws supplement previous ones that allowed the government communications watchdog Roskomnadzor to blacklist obscene or extremist websites, as well as legislation that tried to force big internet companies to keep their Russian data on Russia-based servers in the name of “digital sovereignty.” That led electricity quiz grade 9 to the banning of LinkedIn in Russia, after it refused to comply with the new rules, but the Russian government has so far declined to go after other big companies like Facebook, Twitter, or Google, presumably out of fear of a public backlash.

“There is nothing new happening with these laws,” says Alexei Simonov, head of the Glasnost Defense Foundation, a press freedom watchdog. “Our electricity symbols and meanings state has already assembled a wide array of instruments with which to censor, with the goal of protecting power. But, like most Russian laws, they are not really gas natural meant to be used. They are warning signs. They draw the lines which people should not cross. It’s not clear how these new laws will change the situation.”