Fat knowledge how much energy does an elevator use electricity youtube billy elliot

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After listening to the author of the Long Emergency speak of how we are running out of oil and that buildings over 7 stories were going to go away because we wouldn’t have the energy to run elevators, I wondered how much energy it took to run an elevator. I think this guy is a quack and history will prove him wrong, but I still wanted to know if there was anything to what he said.

For health reasons, probably. Walking up a couple of flights of stairs a day is good excerise and your heart will be happy with you. But in terms of reducing energy usage for environmental reasons, not really. gas zeta costa rica There are many other things that are much easier to do that would have bigger impacts. Changing 3 100 W light bulbs to CFLs would save more electricity than the typical apartment dweller going cold turkey on elevators.

– In part of the runs, the elevator does not spend energyAs I understand it, each run is an up and down so this means there are 4 single leg journeys a day. I believe this assumes that you are the only person in the elevator each time you take it. This might over estimate the total as sometimes you share a ride. On the other hand, sometimes you are on the ground floor and the elevator has to travel many floors to get to you, so this would under-estimate the total. Hopefully they more or less cancel each other out.

Spanky, If I cut out all of my 100s of small wastes, the result can be a big savings. Good point. But, for me I would rather focus on a few big changes and let all the little stuff slide, then try and make hundreds of small changes. Also, I find that people propose these small changes because they have no desire to make large/significant changes. electricity off That people feel that they are a good environmentalist just because they recycle or don’t take the elevator even if they use lots of gasoline, eat lots of meat, and live in a large house or otherwise live an environmentally deleterious lifestyle. For me, I just want to focus on three things: 1) limit the amount of driving/drive a fuel efficient car/use public transportation 2) live in a small apartment with little need for heating or cooling 3) a diet with limited amounts of meat I think you get the most bang for you buck by focusing on these 3 things rather than lots of the small things. However, if *everyone* were to use the elevator less, that would add up to significant amount of energy… I am not a big fan of looking at it this way. Instead, I look at it is if everyone reduced their energy consumption by 1%, than at the national level energy consumption will be cut by 1%. The savings at the country level will be much larger in absolute terms, 300 million times as large in the US, but if we want to make large cuts in emissions at the national level, say 20%, everyone needs to cut their emissions by 20%.

Anon, One may wonder if you came with a preconceived notion of what the answer should be and when this post didn’t conform that you chose to blindly attack the source rather than questioning your own preconceived notion. Do you have any reason to believe that Otis is providing inaccurate information? While that is possible, I don’t see how it would be in their interest to do so. electricity physics problems If you have another source for information, I will gladly look at it and revise the post. As for the basic physics requiring more than an insignificant amount of power, I guess it depends on what your definition of significant power is. As I calculate it, using an elevator for a year uses 70 kWh. In a physics sense, 70 kWh is a significant amount of energy. But, since the average home uses 10,000 kWh a year, compared to that is seems insignificant. The average American uses the equivalent of 100 energy slaves. So, the amount of energy needed to run an elevator might be large when looked at in terms of human power, but given our additional 100 energy slaves it is not that big. I think a lot of people aren’t aware of just how much energy we use. gas smoker ribs I just watched A Crude Awakening: The Oil Crash. In it they state that one barrel of oil is the equivalent of 25,000 man hours of physical work. Assuming 42 gallons in a barrel of oil, one gallon is the energy equivalent of 600 man hours of physical work. electricity edison While 600 man hours of work sounds significant, one gallon doesn’t, given that each American uses around 500 of them a year. And if you look at all the energy that hits the Earth in the form of solar energy that we aren’t capturing, the amount needed to run an elevator looks even more insignificant.

the update is incorrect. the askpablo site said it would take 1.5 Wh to travel TWO floors, not one. so your conclusion is also incorrect. it may be that the difference lies in the size of the cab you have chosen. a 20 person cab is pretty big–and heavy. also, the elevator type plays a big role in energy consumption. a hydraulic elevator can consume as much as 3 times more energy than a traction elevator. (see this white paper for a detailed discussion: http://www.aceee.org/buildings/coml_equp/elevators.pdf i used an otis elevator website calculator for a six person cab and came pretty close to the askpablo calculation. but the main point here is: please be more careful before publishing (mis)information! it would have been pretty simple to double check what askpablo said before adding your update. fortunately, the link was still valid, so i could double check. this demonstrates why one has to be very careful when obtaining information from the internet. there are very few fact checkers and sloppiness goes unpunished…

anon, the update is incorrect. the askpablo site said it would take 1.5 Wh to travel TWO floors, not one. Actually that is not true. This is what askpablo writes: So, 90.7 kg x 9.8 m/s^2 x 6 m = 5,333.16 J. And 5,333.16 J = 0.0015 kWh. If you assume that the entire system is about 50% efficient you use about 0.003 kWh of electricity to go up two floors (or 0.0015 kWh per person per floor). 1.5 Wh per person per floor (not TWO floors). so your conclusion is also incorrect. My main conclusion was that using an elevator doesn’t use a lot of energy. Had you been correct (which you weren’t) then it would have been .75 Wh per floor, which would have been even less energy and made my conclusion even stronger. but the main point here is: please be more careful before publishing (mis)information! it would have been pretty simple to double check what askpablo said before adding your update. fortunately, the link was still valid, so i could double check. this demonstrates why one has to be very careful when obtaining information from the internet. there are very few fact checkers and sloppiness goes unpunished… gas prices Kettle. Pot. Black.

Elevator manufacturers DO have an incentive to “fudge” the numbers. It’s called marketing! If you inflate energy usage, you inflate potential energy savings. (IMHO Kone’s claims tend to be exaggerated. Otis’s calculations are more realistic.) The reality is, all elevator manufacturers are developing and installing more energy efficient systems. That is what people want. That is what they buy! Elevator systems that are 20-30 years old or older are inherently less energy efficient (and typically last a lot longer too, but that’s another subject.)

Physics is physics. Mass times distance times speed = energy consumed. You can slice it and dice it in dozens of different ways and come up with nearly the same answer. These are all theoretical values because there’s no way to finitely predict usage and demand. electricity was invented Eventually, the manufacturers all come up with comparable products to their competitors.

We need elevators. Hydraulic elevators are less energy efficient than counterweighted traction elevators, but are economically more attractive in low rise buildings. As the installation cost of traction elevators approaches the installation cost of hydraulic elevators, presently in the 3-4 stops range, then the logical choice is the better performance and energy efficiency of a traction elevator. It’s a no brainer!