Feel the burn biochemical pathway that spurs beige fat cells to burn energy is discovered – science newsline gas in oil pressure washer

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A collaborative research team, including bioanalytical neurochemist Alexander G. Zestos of American University, has identified a key signaling pathway that spurs beige fat cells to burn energy, revealing a possible target for obesity therapies in humans. The team, whose findings published today in Nature Medicine, conducted mouse studies to identify the brain receptor known as the CHRNA2 signaling pathway.

In the zebra finch, an extra chromosome exists in the reproductive, or germline, cells. (Songbirds have 40 chromosomes and 41 with the extra chromosome.) Known as the germline-restricted chromosome, its sequence is largely unknown and none of its genes have been identified, until now. Using sophisticated genome-sequencing techniques, American University researchers have identified the first gene of the GRC. This finding could pave the way for further research into what makes a bird male or female.

Genome sequencing has revolutionized genetics. It also requires new mathematical tools to help life scientists make sense of enormous amounts of data. Applying new math, Kristina Crona, an American University assistant professor who researches in the area of mathematical biology, and her colleagues show how ranking pathogen mutants can help scientists understand how mutants evolve to resist drug treatments. This line of research could have implications for the treatment of diseases that can resist drug treatments, such as HIV and malaria.

In physics, the conundrum known as the "few-body problem," how three or more interacting particles behave, has bedeviled scientists for centuries. Equations that describe the physics of few-body systems are usually unsolvable and the methods used to find solutions are unstable. There aren’t many equations that can probe the wide spectrum of possible few-particle dynamics. A new family of mathematical models for mixtures of quantum particles could help light the way.

The chemical best-known as a female reproductive hormone–estrogen–could help fight off neurodegenerative conditions and diseases in the future. Now, new research by American University neuroscience Professor Colin Saldanha shows that estrogen synthesis, a process naturally occurring in the brains of zebra finches, may also fight off neuroinflammation caused by infection that occurs elsewhere in the body. The finding reveals clues about the interplay between the body’s neuroendocrine and immune systems.

Coral reefs sustain marine life all over the world and protect its vulnerable coastlines. But the reefs are increasingly endangered, mainly because of pollution and rising ocean temperatures. Scientists, including American University‘s Kiho Kim are racing the clock to assess the true extent of the damage before it becomes irreversible. Today, new technologies are making it possible to see inside coral, to examine the skeleton cores for devastation caused by humans.

WASHINGTON, D.C. (December 15, 2016) – Personal health wearable devices used to monitor heart rates, sleep patterns, calories, and even stress levels raise new privacy and security risks, according to a report released today by researchers at American University and the Center for Digital Democracy. Watches, fitness bands, and so-called "smart" clothing, linked to apps and mobile devices, are part of a growing "connected-health" system in the U.S., promising to provide people with more efficient ways to manage their own health.