Fired erie official a.j. krieger named interim town manager of firestone – boulder daily camera gas city indiana weather

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Krieger’s termination in Erie, which came suddenly and without any reason given to the public, saw a fair share of resistance from residents and at least one trustee. And in Firestone, former Town Manager Bruce Nickerson resigned, and was subsequently placed on paid leave, after allegations of workplace misconduct by multiple women surfaced in March.

Erie Trustee Dan Woog, who offered the sole "no" vote on the decision to fire Krieger, criticized the murky circumstances leading up to the meeting. Woog said that he was not present for any discussions ahead of the meeting regarding plans to fire Krieger, and that if any of the other trustees had met or talked privately ahead of the vote, it may constitute a violation of the state’s open meetings law.

Residents and dissenting Erie officials have alleged that Krieger’s deposing likely was the result of the town’s leadership overhaul last month. Citing legal obstacles that typically surround personnel changeovers, Carroll on Thursday said she could not comment on the issue.

However, she has offered some cryptic insight into the matter in the time since the board’s decision, saying: "In record numbers, residents cast their votes in last month‘s municipal election to define the vision for Erie’s future. A new path was articulated with conviction, and it’s incumbent upon (elected officials) to ensure the right tools and resources are in place to honor the voice of the people."

Prior to his nearly decade-long stint in Erie, Krieger served as city manager in Ferguson, Mo., for three years before he was suspended from his post by the City Council in 2004. He would be reinstated just days later after an outcry from residents.

In the last months of Krieger’s Erie tenure, he presided over several landmark oil and gas regulatory efforts, including the town’s controversial odor ordinance — currently the subject of litigation with a local drilling firm — and increased setback requirements.

Krieger’s termination in Erie, which came suddenly and without any reason given to the public, saw a fair share of resistance from residents and at least one trustee. And in Firestone, former Town Manager Bruce Nickerson resigned, and was subsequently placed on paid leave, after allegations of workplace misconduct by multiple women surfaced in March.

Erie Trustee Dan Woog, who offered the sole "no" vote on the decision to fire Krieger, criticized the murky circumstances leading up to the meeting. Woog said that he was not present for any discussions ahead of the meeting regarding plans to fire Krieger, and that if any of the other trustees had met or talked privately ahead of the vote, it may constitute a violation of the state’s open meetings law.

Residents and dissenting Erie officials have alleged that Krieger’s deposing likely was the result of the town’s leadership overhaul last month. Citing legal obstacles that typically surround personnel changeovers, Carroll on Thursday said she could not comment on the issue.

However, she has offered some cryptic insight into the matter in the time since the board’s decision, saying: "In record numbers, residents cast their votes in last month‘s municipal election to define the vision for Erie’s future. A new path was articulated with conviction, and it’s incumbent upon (elected officials) to ensure the right tools and resources are in place to honor the voice of the people."

Prior to his nearly decade-long stint in Erie, Krieger served as city manager in Ferguson, Mo., for three years before he was suspended from his post by the City Council in 2004. He would be reinstated just days later after an outcry from residents.

In the last months of Krieger’s Erie tenure, he presided over several landmark oil and gas regulatory efforts, including the town’s controversial odor ordinance — currently the subject of litigation with a local drilling firm — and increased setback requirements.