First month of ‘200-day battle’ is 120 percent success_ n. korea _ nk news – north korea news

North Korean industrial output reached 120 percent of its target during the first month of a recently launched “200 day battle,” state newspaper Rodong Sinmun said on Tuesday, though failing to provide reliable data to back up its claims.

The latest mass mobilization campaign, which kicked off in early June, follows the completion of a high intensity nationwide “70 day battle” which ended in May, just prior to North Korea’s Seventh Party Congress event.

“All workers and members of Korean Workers’ Party (WPK) have continued with the spirit of the successful 70-day battle and flourished (during) the first month of the 200-day battle with great creation and achievements,” the state-run Rodong Sinmun wrote on Tuesday.

According to the newspaper, industrial output levels reached as high as 120 to 130 percent in areas related to electricity production, coal, metalworking, railway transportation, and progress at major construction sites including Ryomyong street, a new residential sector under construction in Pyongyang.

A major portion of the Rodong’s story focused on the state increasing electricity output, a goal which Kim Jong Un emphasized during the Seventh Congress in May, and recently reiterated by North Korean Premier of the Cabinet Pak Pong Ju.

Thermoelectric power plants at Bukchang, Pyongyang, Chongchon and Sunchon recently went through modification and upgrade procedures in their coal conveyors and feedwater systems, the Rodong said, to increase electricity output while lowering the cost of production.

And North Korea’s hydroelectric power plants, including on the Changjin, Hochon, and Taedong rivers and the Seodusu plant have gone through facilities and technology management update processes to increase electricity output per ton of water used.

A South Korean energy expert said the increased coal production mentioned in the Rodong report, coupled with increased rainfall compared to last year, combined to contribute towards increasing electricity output levels in both thermo and hydro power plants.

“North Korean power plants have been renovating and modernizing their facilities simultaneously as well, which is another factor that supports (the idea of) increased output as claimed” Lee Seok-gi of the Korea Institute for Industrial Economics and Trade told NK News.

But the Rodong report, besides providing overall percentage figures, failed to provide any objective data to support its claims, with footage and interviews from last year showing that even in the heart of North Korea, Pyongyang still often suffers from electricity shortages.

However Lee – even under the pretense that North Korean claims of increased electricity output are true – said the country was still far from reaching adequate levels of electricity production.

“The country’s electricity output is getting better, because it has no room to get any worse,” Lee explained, adding that it is during the drought or winter when the North suffers most from shortages, when its hydro plants struggle to keep up output.

North Korean hydro plants require masses of running water to generate energy, which is logically reduced during times of drought or deep freezing.

North Korean industrial output reached 120 percent of its target during the first month of a recently launched “200 day battle,” state newspaper Rodong Sinmun said on Tuesday, though failing to provide reliable data to back up its claims.

The latest mass mobilization campaign, which kicked off in early June, follows the completion of a high intensity nationwide “70 day battle” which ended in May, just prior to North Korea’s Seventh Party Congress event.

“All workers and members of Korean Workers’ Party (WPK) have continued with the spirit of the successful 70-day battle and flourished (during) the first month of the 200-day battle with great creation and achievements,” the state-run Rodong Sinmun wrote on Tuesday.

According to the newspaper, industrial output levels reached as high as 120 to 130 percent in areas related to electricity production, coal, metalworking, railway transportation, and progress at major construction sites including Ryomyong street, a new residential sector under construction in Pyongyang.

A major portion of the Rodong’s story focused on the state increasing electricity output, a goal which Kim Jong Un emphasized during the Seventh Congress in May, and recently reiterated by North Korean Premier of the Cabinet Pak Pong Ju.

Thermoelectric power plants at Bukchang, Pyongyang, Chongchon and Sunchon recently went through modification and upgrade procedures in their coal conveyors and feedwater systems, the Rodong said, to increase electricity output while lowering the cost of production.

And North Korea’s hydroelectric power plants, including on the Changjin, Hochon, and Taedong rivers and the Seodusu plant have gone through facilities and technology management update processes to increase electricity output per ton of water used.

A South Korean energy expert said the increased coal production mentioned in the Rodong report, coupled with increased rainfall compared to last year, combined to contribute towards increasing electricity output levels in both thermo and hydro power plants.

“North Korean power plants have been renovating and modernizing their facilities simultaneously as well, which is another factor that supports (the idea of) increased output as claimed” Lee Seok-gi of the Korea Institute for Industrial Economics and Trade told NK News.

But the Rodong report, besides providing overall percentage figures, failed to provide any objective data to support its claims, with footage and interviews from last year showing that even in the heart of North Korea, Pyongyang still often suffers from electricity shortages.

However Lee – even under the pretense that North Korean claims of increased electricity output are true – said the country was still far from reaching adequate levels of electricity production.

“The country’s electricity output is getting better, because it has no room to get any worse,” Lee explained, adding that it is during the drought or winter when the North suffers most from shortages, when its hydro plants struggle to keep up output.

North Korean hydro plants require masses of running water to generate energy, which is logically reduced during times of drought or deep freezing.