Food – preppers gas vs electric stove

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The United States government’s position is every resident should have a minimum of 72 hours of water and food stored. The reasoning behind this is 72 hours or three days is the average time it takes for federal emergency services to arrive, set up operations, assess needs, and to begin distribution of aid. This is a good start and for many the only step necessary. Purchasing and storing food and water for three days for each member of your household is relatively cheap and easy. While there are many purveyors of “survival” rations with 10+ year shelf lives I recommend that the beginning prepper stay away from these types of products. Especially the prepackaged 72 hour kits that contain “survival crackers”. While these crackers do indeed provide the claimed nutrition they are bland and much more expensive when compared to alternatives.

The best advice I can give regarding storing any amount of food is to “store what you eat and eat what you store”. This costs less than cases of freeze dried meals that may only give you 800-1000 calories a day. Also it has the added benefit of giving some small comfort in the familiar taste when the stress of an emergency is starting to set in. Either store bought or home canned soups, meats either canned or dried, instant potatoes, rice and/or pasta sides are basic fare that will supply a 72 hour kit easily and cheaply. While a portable camping stove of some kind may be a good idea if you need to prepare food for a family, a few cans of chafing dish fuel might suffice to heat soup or boil water for a single person. The United States government’s position is every resident should have a minimum of 72 hours of water and food stored. The reasoning behind this is 72 hours or three days is the average time it takes for federal emergency services to arrive, set up operations, assess needs, and to begin distribution of aid. This is a good start and for many the only step necessary. Purchasing and storing food and water for three days for each member of your household is relatively cheap and easy. While there are many purveyors of “survival” rations with 10+ year shelf lives I recommend that the beginning prepper stay away from these types of products. Especially the prepackaged 72 hour kits that contain “survival crackers”. While these crackers do indeed provide the claimed nutrition they are bland and much more expensive when compared to alternatives.

The best advice I can give regarding storing any amount of food is to “store what you eat and eat what you store”. This costs less than cases of freeze dried meals that may only give you 800-1000 calories a day. Also it has the added benefit of giving some small comfort in the familiar taste when the stress of an emergency is starting to set in. Either store bought or home canned soups, meats either canned or dried, instant potatoes, rice and/or pasta sides are basic fare that will supply a 72 hour kit easily and cheaply. While a portable camping stove of some kind may be a good idea if you need to prepare food for a family, a few cans of chafing dish fuel might suffice to heat soup or boil water for a single person.