For charleston harbor dredging, where there’s a will there’s a way business postandcourier.com kd 7 electricity socks

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During an August vacation at his Kiawah Island home, Will telephoned Newsome and asked if he could visit the SPA’s Wando Welch Terminal in Mount Pleasant. Newsome, who calls Will his favorite TV commentator — “Back all the way to his time on ‘This Week with David Brinkley’,” he said. — was happy to oblige.

The first hurdle was cleared last week with the Senate’s vote. The House is expected to take up the measure soon, and a final bill likely will be sent to President Obama during the post-election, lame-duck session. Federal dollars could start flowing by the 2018 fiscal year. South Carolina legislators have already set aside $300 million. The dredging is scheduled for completion by 2020.

From that luncheon, Will wrote a column in early 2012 lamenting the red tape that was keeping the project in limbo. Will also explained why dredging was needed to keep the Port of Charleston competitive in an era of big ships sailing through an expanded Panama Canal.

Roper St. Francis is getting closer to choosing its next leader as longtime CEO David Dunlap prepares to retire. The big health care system has closed in on its “final candidates,” spokesman Andy Lyons said, and it expects to make a decision this fall.

If gas prices jumped a bit higher over the weekend in South Carolina, blame it on the severing of a major gas line in Alabama. The Colonial Pipeline runs from Houston to New York through the Upstate, providing fuel to about 50 million people on the East Coast.

A GasBuddy gas price service analyst predicted prices could spike up to 20 cents a gallon across the Palmetto State until the line is repaired, possibly sometime this week. Fuel providers are scrambling to find alternative ways to transport fuel to gas stations, including ships from Houston and more transport trucks on the roads. Other states that could see spikes include Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia. The Northeast market is not expected to be as affected because it can get fuel from other locations.

Just released, the latest edition of the aerospace giant’s Custom Hangar catalog features a collection of furniture and artwork derived from genuine aircraft parts. Among the offerings: a bench made from a 727-200 jetliner wing slat; a lounge chair made from a DC-9 Pratt & Whitney engine cowling; and a gleaming aluminum and stainless steel wine bar made from the engine of a DC-9/MD-80 airliner.

The buyers for Custom Hangar “climb through aviation boneyards and storage facilities in search of rare artifacts that they refurbish and finish by hand,” according to a Boeing news release. “Each piece is placed in a museum-quality mounting fabricated using authentic materials such as aviation-grade aluminum, steel and titanium.”

And you don’t have to be Richard Branson to place an order. A gift-boxed pen made out of a 747 circuit-breaker tab can be had for just $50 while an aluminum window frame from a 747-100 can be had for $695. More upscale items include a $5,900 industrial-chic bench built around a slat removed from the wing of a 727-200 and the DC-9/MD-80 wine bar for $9,500.

Artifacts in the catalog represent a selection of current Custom Hangar offerings. Additional items are available online at BoeingStore.com and in Boeing Store retail outlets nationwide. Boeing says new artifacts are constantly being discovered and added to the collection.

Master brewer and owner Chris Brown wrote on the company’s Facebook page that employees have been bitten five times during the past six months by dogs visiting the Dorchester Road brew house. In the latest incident earlier this month, a guest’s dog bit a bartender in the face.

“We love dogs. Most of us have dogs,” Brown said. “I have three myself. … I have to look out for my staff. Most of you are responsible dog owners, and I am truly sorry if this changes your interest in my brewery or tap room. We have been dog-friendly since we opened, and if I felt there was a way to keep things the way they were, I would.

He went on to say “it is not something I want to do, but it’s something that has to happen. I hope everyone can understand where we are coming from,” he said. “We still love your dogs, but from now on, you have to leave them at home when you come to see us at HCB.”

FMR Corp. of Boston was first out of the chute. The mutual fund giant, which owns Fidelity, reported in June that it owned 4.28 million shares of Ingevity Corp., the North Charleston-based specialty chemical business spun off as an independent company by WestRock in the spring. FMR’s 10.2 percent stake barely edged out Wall Street investment powerhouse BlackRock, which recently disclosed that it too owns about 10.2 percent of NGVT, or 4.27 million shares.

BlackRock also notified federal stock market regulators last week that it has bumped up its holdings in another Charleston business, Blackbaud Inc. Its ownership in the Daniel Island-based technology company was 10 percent as of Aug. 31 compared to 9.5 percent at the start of the year.

Sydney Proctor, 16, a junior at James Island Charter High School, has been signed to a three-year contract with Ford Model NYC, joining the ranks of former Ford models Christie Brinkley, Naomi Campbell, Brooke Shields, Kim Basinger, Lindsay Lohan and Brooke Burke.

Along with Ford, Proctor was scouted by other top New York agency reps from Next Model Management, Muse Model Management and Wilhelmina Models, and reviewed by talent agents from Alpha Tyler Casting of Atlanta, Ga.; Karen Greer Models & Talent of Hollywood, Fla.; and Directions USA of Greensboro, N.C.

“Sydney attended one of our local auditions and stood out right away due to her height and classic model looks,” recalled Discovery Spotlight executive director Cory Dueger. “I have no doubt that this is the start of a very promising career for her in the fashion industry.”

If gas prices jumped a bit higher over the weekend in South Carolina, blame it on the severing of a major gas line in Alabama. The Colonial Pipeline runs from Houston to New York through the Upstate, providing fuel to about 50 million people on the East Coast.

A GasBuddy gas price service analyst predicted prices could spike up to 20 cents a gallon across the Palmetto State until the line is repaired, possibly sometime this week. Fuel providers are scrambling to find alternative ways to transport fuel to gas stations, including ships from Houston and more transport trucks on the roads. Other states that could see spikes include Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia. The Northeast market is not expected to be as affected because it can get fuel from other locations.