Ford to stop selling most of their cars in north america electricity news philippines

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Ford today announced it will phase out most cars it sells in North America. According to its latest financial release, the auto giant “will transition to two vehicles” — the Mustang and an unannounced vehicle, the Focus Active, being the only traditional cars it sells in the region. Ford sees 90 percent of its North America portfolio in trucks, utilities and commercial vehicles. Citing a reduction in consumer demand and product profitability, Ford is in turn not investing in the next generation of sedans. The Taurus is no more.

Currently, Ford sells six sedans and coupes in North America: the Fiesta, Focus, Fusion, C-Max, Mustang and Taurus. This lineup hits multiple segments, from the compact Fiesta to the mid-size Focus, C-Max and Fusion to the full-size Taurus. The Mustang stands alone as the lone coupe.

It’s likely Lincoln’s sedans will also disappear, though this was not explicitly stated in today’s press release. Lincoln currently sells the mid-size MKZ and full-size Continental — both share platforms with Ford counterparts. If Ford is phasing out development of sedan platforms, Lincoln will likely suffer, too.

This reduction in traditional cars was a long time coming. North America consumers have increasingly turned to crossovers, trucks and SUVs over sedans and small cars. A trip to any parking lot will likely produce more evidence to this movement. There are several factors involved, from more fuel-efficient and better-equipped trucks and SUVs to improved safety ratings and ride qualities of these vehicles.

Industry-wide, “car” sales have been a nightmare: During the first three months of the year, “truck” sales jumped 10%, and “car” sales plunged 11%. In 2017, truck sales rose 4.3%, and car sales plunged 11%. And so on. This divergence of dropping car sales and rising truck sales started in 2015, and since then, “car” sales have gotten relentlessly crushed.

Part of the problem is that the industry’s division between “cars” and “trucks” is peculiar. “Trucks” include pickups, vans, SUVs, and compact SUVs (crossovers). But some SUVs and all crossovers are based on a unibody car chassis (instead of body-on-frame, which is the case with trucks). They’re stubbier versions of station wagons. For consumers, the switch from cars to crossovers is natural.

And part of the problem is that consumers have fallen out of love with cars. Gas is cheap (though getting more expensive), SUVs and crossovers are cool and immensely popular. And in parts of the country, pickups have for decades been the most popular US-branded vehicle type, and that love affair has only increased in recent years.

The Ranger in North America was not related to the Ranger sold globally. For a while, South America also got a version of our old truck, but that’s no longer the case. The global Ranger was an outgrowth or evolution of the Mazda B-series trucks, which continued on their own path outside of the USA even after Mazda North America adopted rebadged Rangers and the B-series for our market. Eventually that truck (the global B-series & Ranger) grew into a mid-size vehicle, while ours remained compact. The current iteration of that Ranger is known the T-6, and has been on the market for several years outside of North America. I mention all of this because the Ranger that we are getting here next year is a version of that truck. It is not, as I said, related to the Ranger that used to be here. As cerving mentioned, nobody makes a compact pickup anymore – at least not for our market – because the bulk of truck customers want something bigger than compact, even if they don’t want full-size (which have also gotten bigger). The Ranger will not change that.

Sorry, but not quite it. The 2WD, 4-cylinder, 5-speed manual regular cab truck can approach 30 mpg if driven properly. Change any of those variables and that goes out the window. The extended cab adds enough weight that the 4-cylinder struggles and the 3.0L V6 is a dog of an engine. Marginal torque increase over the I-4, but with fuel economy near the 4.0L. But still, apparently there aren’t that many customers that value that in this market.

Ford is marketing the new Ranger as sort of lifestyle vehicle – if you’re into the active, outdoors, sporty, woodsy sort of thing, or need to haul dirt bikes or kayaks or whatever, that’s what they want you to buy a Ranger for. Guys hauling mulch, lumber, towing trailers, doing real work, need an F-series. Folks looking for a small delivery vehicle should buy Transit Connect (which was a big part of the previous Ranger’s cancellation). The Ranger is not for these customers. Folks just looking for a cheap car, well, the Ranger is not for you either. Or, at least, that’s not Ford’s marketing aim with this truck.

Sorry, but not quite it. The 2WD, 4-cylinder, 5-speed manual regular cab truck can approach 30 mpg if driven properly. Change any of those variables and that goes out the window. The extended cab adds enough weight that the 4-cylinder struggles and the 3.0L V6 is a dog of an engine. Marginal torque increase over the I-4, but with fuel economy near the 4.0L. But still, apparently there aren’t that many customers that value that in this market.

Ford is marketing the new Ranger as sort of lifestyle vehicle – if you’re into the active, outdoors, sporty, woodsy sort of thing, or need to haul dirt bikes or kayaks or whatever, that’s what they want you to buy a Ranger for. Guys hauling mulch, lumber, towing trailers, doing real work, need an F-series. Folks looking for a small delivery vehicle should buy Transit Connect (which was a big part of the previous Ranger’s cancellation). The Ranger is not for these customers. Folks just looking for a cheap car, well, the Ranger is not for you either. Or, at least, that’s not Ford’s marketing aim with this truck.

This. I have a 97 4cyl 5spd extended cab ranger. I average 26mpg mixed driving. By contrast, my 08 250 gets roughly 14 city and 22 hwy with a tuner. My wife’s transit gets 25ish mixed. The room inside the transit is honestly amazing, so much storage space with the seats folded, I’m sure the commercial version has quite a bit more room. I have been tempted to try putting my dirt bike in the back but she would be less than stoked about it.