From a solar eclipse to a star gazing warrior_ winners of the astronomy photographer of the year are revealed _ daily mail online j gastroenterol

The planets, stars and galaxies in the astronomical stretches of space that extend beyond Earth provide photographers with endless opportunities to take fascinating pictures. Now a selection judged best to be the photographs of space taken this year have been revealed – as part of this year’s Insight Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition. The overall winner was a picture captured by Yu Jun in China, showing the Baily’s Beads effect during the total solar eclipse of 9 March 2016 captured from Luwuk, Indonesia. The overall winner shows the Baily’s Beads effect during the total solar eclipse of 9 March 2016 captured from Luwuk, Indonesia.

Gas house eggs As the moon passes in front of our star, the sun, the rugged surface of our natural satellite allows beads of sunlight to escape in some places and not in others As the moon passes in front of our star, the sun, the rugged surface of our natural satellite allows beads of sunlight to escape in some places and not in others. ‘This is such a visually striking image, with its succession of fiery arcs all perfectly balanced around the pitch black circle of totality,’ said competition judge and Royal Observatory Public Astronomer, Dr Marek Kukula.

Winner of the Aurorae category. On the evening of the total solar eclipse in 20 March 2015, the people of Spitsbergen were treated to a second natural lightshow in the form of the Aurora Borealis.

Electricity games online free At the time the photograph was taken the sun was shining 9 degrees below the horizon, meaning it was evening nautical twilight on the shore of Greenland Sea The competition, which is run by the Royal Observatory Greenwich in association with Insight Investment and BBC Sky at Night Magazine, is now in its eighth year. ‘Insight Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2016 has received more outstanding pictures than ever before,’ a spokesperson form the Royal Observatory Greenwich said. This year the competition received a record number of over 4,500 spectacular entries from enthusiastic amateurs and professional photographers from over 80 countries.

Winners of other categories and special prizes include the touching scene of a Maasai warrior bestowing his knowledge of the stars on his son as they gaze up at the Milky Way by Robin Stuart from Kenya, which was Highly Commended in the People & Space category. An astonishing picture of the Milky Way’s satellite galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud, showcasing stars of all ages lying within its 14,000 light year diameter, from the camera of Carlos Fairbairn (Brazil), won him the Sir Patrick Moore prize for Best Newcomer. The seemingly pop art inspired canvas of the rainbow of colours exhibited by the brightest star in our sky, Sirius, taken by Steve Brown from the UK won the Stars & Nebulae category. The arresting sight of Comet Catalina hurtling through the night sky, leaving a dust trail in its wake, while a second tail of ionised gas emanates from its coma, shot by Gerald Rhemann from Austria was runner up in the Planets, Comets & Asteroids group.

The competition, which is run by the Royal Observatory Greenwich in association with Insight Investment and BBC Sky at Night Magazine, is now in its eighth year. ‘Insight Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2016 has received more outstanding pictures than ever before,’ a spokesperson form the Royal Observatory Greenwich said. This year the competition received a record number of over 4,500 spectacular entries from enthusiastic amateurs and professional photographers from over 80 countries. The winners of the competition’s nine categories and two special prizes were announced on 15 September at a special award ceremony at the Royal Observatory Greenwich.

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