Full thickness fissure will i ever run again ( !!! – orthopedics forum – ehealthforum electricity word search ks2

This would be considered a Grade II articular cartilage degeneration. The classifications basically goes: Grade 0, normal; Grade I, softening of the cartilage; Grade II, fissures; Grade III, partial thickness loss of cartilage; Grade IV, exposure of subchondral bone.

The problem with hyaline cartilage, which is what covers the bones inside of joints, is that it cannot regenerate itself. It has limited repair capabilities. If it does repair a small portion of the articular cartilage, it is with fibrocartilage. Fibrocartilage is sort of a scar for cartilage. It is not as good as hyaline cartilage, not as durable, or smooth.

What determines how quickly our cartilage will wear out inside of ours joints, is mostly genetic. If your patients has significant osteoarthritis (OA) (also known as degenerative joint disease or DJD), then you probably will to. Exercise has not been shown to cause OA. However, significant trauma to the joints while playing sports can accelerate the degeneration. In other words, if you tear up a ligament, fracture into a joint, tear a meniscus, then yes, athletics may speed up the development of DJD. But, just running or playing, in and of itself, does not cause OA.

There is nothing that can be done about the degeneration of the cartilage. Some patients swear by the joint supplements, such as chondroitin, hyaluronic acid, and glucosamine. There is some anecdotal evidence that these may help thicken the cartilage, but no strict research has ever shown this to be true.

There is no medicine or surgery that will replace generalized cartilage loss in the joints. It is possible to replace discrete small areas of full thickness cartilage loss, in young patients, but these procedures will not help the overall loss.

So, it is basically up to you. Do you want to play and run bad enough to put up with some pain while doing it? You most likely will not speed up the development of DJD, unless you sustain a significant injury. You can try the joint supplement medicines. Antiinflammatories may make you more comfortable. Some patients like a neoprene sleeve when they exercise. You can get them with a patellar cutout. While other patients do not like the knee sleeves, as they push the patellar back into the femoral groove, increasing the pain. But, that is a personal preference.

This would be considered a Grade II articular cartilage degeneration. The classifications basically goes: Grade 0, normal; Grade I, softening of the cartilage; Grade II, fissures; Grade III, partial thickness loss of cartilage; Grade IV, exposure of subchondral bone.

The problem with hyaline cartilage, which is what covers the bones inside of joints, is that it cannot regenerate itself. It has limited repair capabilities. If it does repair a small portion of the articular cartilage, it is with fibrocartilage. Fibrocartilage is sort of a scar for cartilage. It is not as good as hyaline cartilage, not as durable, or smooth.

What determines how quickly our cartilage will wear out inside of ours joints, is mostly genetic. If your patients has significant osteoarthritis (OA) (also known as degenerative joint disease or DJD), then you probably will to. Exercise has not been shown to cause OA. However, significant trauma to the joints while playing sports can accelerate the degeneration. In other words, if you tear up a ligament, fracture into a joint, tear a meniscus, then yes, athletics may speed up the development of DJD. But, just running or playing, in and of itself, does not cause OA.

There is nothing that can be done about the degeneration of the cartilage. Some patients swear by the joint supplements, such as chondroitin, hyaluronic acid, and glucosamine. There is some anecdotal evidence that these may help thicken the cartilage, but no strict research has ever shown this to be true.

There is no medicine or surgery that will replace generalized cartilage loss in the joints. It is possible to replace discrete small areas of full thickness cartilage loss, in young patients, but these procedures will not help the overall loss.

So, it is basically up to you. Do you want to play and run bad enough to put up with some pain while doing it? You most likely will not speed up the development of DJD, unless you sustain a significant injury. You can try the joint supplement medicines. Antiinflammatories may make you more comfortable. Some patients like a neoprene sleeve when they exercise. You can get them with a patellar cutout. While other patients do not like the knee sleeves, as they push the patellar back into the femoral groove, increasing the pain. But, that is a personal preference.

As to when, and if, the cartilage progresses on the Grade III, cannot be determined exactly. No one can say that in 2 years, 4 months, 1 week, and 3 days you will be at a Grade III. You may not progress for many, many years. You may not progress at all. But, you may progress in just a short amount of time. No one knows.

You can get an idea though. If your parents, or siblings, developed severe degenerative joint problems, then you probably will to. But, if none of your older family had problems, then you probably won’t either. But, it is not an exact science.

A compression wrap is about the same as a knee sleeve. The neoprene sleeve is made of the same material that scuba diver’s suits are made of. They can be purchased with a hole cut out for the patella. This takes some of the pressure off the patella. Since your ligaments are okay, you do not need the expensive 3 to 5 thousand dollar sports braces, custom made, carbon fiber, high speed, low drag varieties. Just find one that provides you with some support and makes your knee feel a little better.