Gas water heater installation questions – page 3 k gas cylinder

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Another thing happened on this job. When I initially contacted this company I asked about the permit and they said they always get permits for WH change-outs. Then when the plumber came to install I asked what I need to do to schedule the inspection, he said a permit wasn’t required because it was a "service call". So I called the office after the job to ask about it and found out they had not gotten the permit but would get it if I wanted it, but said if they got one that I would have to stay home all day and wait for the inspector.

I think they play this game where, if you ask beforehand, they tell you they always get a permit. Then they don’t actually really get one unless you ask, and then they try to discourage you by telling you that if they get one, you will have to stay home all day to wait for the inspector. I see how that this would save them some costs, but as a customer it doesn’t inspire confidence or trust.It’s funny because in my state each city has it’s own requirements for whether or not you should pull a permit on a gas water heater. Some city’s want a permit pulled and others do not. The price of a permit can easily range from $45 to $285.00 depending on what city or county you live in.

In this case your inspector made sure the job met the minimum safety requirements and passed it off. However, there were a couple things that needed to be done to bring it fully up to code. This things are not about safety, but mainly to help the appliance last longer and use slightly less energy.

As far as your contract goes I think your in for a big battle. The inspector passed everything so the contractor has no professional obligation to you anymore. Your verbal agreement that everything be brought up to code is a "he said she said" situation which is very difficult to enforce. Depending on how the venting is set up in the garage it may be expensive to replace the old single wall material so the contractor will likely be tempted to walk away. Me personally I wouldn’t walk and I always make sure my work is fully up to code. That’s why I have a good reputation. But, most contractors would walk away from this dispute.

It’s funny because in my state each city has it’s own requirements for whether or not you should pull a permit on a gas water heater. Some city’s want a permit pulled and others do not. The price of a permit can easily range from $45 to $285.00 depending on what city or county you live in.

In this case your inspector made sure the job met the minimum safety requirements and passed it off. However, there were a couple things that needed to be done to bring it fully up to code. This things are not about safety, but mainly to help the appliance last longer and use slightly less energy.

As far as your contract goes I think your in for a big battle. The inspector passed everything so the contractor has no professional obligation to you anymore. Your verbal agreement that everything be brought up to code is a "he said she said" situation which is very difficult to enforce. Depending on how the venting is set up in the garage it may be expensive to replace the old single wall material so the contractor will likely be tempted to walk away. Me personally I wouldn’t walk and I always make sure my work is fully up to code. That’s why I have a good reputation. But, most contractors would walk away from this dispute.I like your attitude. Hopefully I can find someone locally who works like you do. I’d rather pay more for a job done right.