Gassers – george klass remembers… electricity production in china

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The official class name was “Gas Coupe & Sedan” class, which was soon rounded off to just a Gasser class. A Gasser is (or was) basically a stock production type vehicle with a hopped-up engine. A stock car with a non-stock engine as it were. And the engine did not need to be the same brand as the car. For instance, an old Ford coupe with a later model Oldsmobile engine would fit right into a Gasser class.

fastest class was called the AA/GS class. All the cars were classified by dividing the weight of the car by the cubic inches of engine displacement. This would then give us the “weight per cubic inch”, which would then define which class the car would compete in. A 3000 pound car with a 300 cubic inch engine would work out to “10 pounds per cubic inch”, for instance.

Since any production type car could run in the Gasser classes, diversity went to the extreme. gas national average I realize (sometimes painfully) that we are now in the 21st Century, and today, some of the best drag racing comes in the form of “Door Cars” (many of which run quicker and faster than the Top Fuel dragsters did in my day). Well, the Gasser classes of the 1950’s and 1960’s were not called “Door Cars”, they were just cars with doors.

It soon became apparent that while "bigger may be better" when discussing some things, it wasn’t the case with the Gasser vehicles. The search for the better (lighter and smaller) Gasser vehicle eventually turned to an old American car company, the Willys Motor Co. (originally called, Willys-Overland). Willys had been building cars since it was founded in 1908. It’s big claim to fame came during World War II, with the building of the Willys Jeep. It turned out that the Willys sedans (and some pick-up trucks) built between 1933 and 1940 could be made into a great Gasser race car. And like the cell phone is today, everyone running a Gasser just had to have one. And then, in the natural evolution of things, it was determined that even the Willys was deemed to be too large. electricity per kwh calculator At this point, many of the heavy hitters in the Gasser ranks went into the Anglia-Austin phase.

This 1941 Studebaker was purported to be the first "real" Gasser for racer Doug "Cookie" Cook. While he raced his 1937 Chevy Coupe in the Gasser classes all over SoCal (with a blown Chevy small block under the hood), the ’37 was really Doug’s street car. This Studebaker was modified to be strictly a Gasser from the git-go, and probably was using Doug’s blown small block out of his Chevy Coupe. This was the natural order of things back in the day. The first Gassers were typically street cars, such as a hot 1950 Oldsmobile for instance. The popularity of the class soon saw guys with Ford Model-A’s, and 1932-1934 Ford hot rod street cars converting over to running in the Gasser classes. And then came the Studebakers. These cars were never known as "hot rods" at the time (they were not "cool"). gas oil ratio for weed eater I did not know of any hot rodders that coveted a Studebaker. But they made great Gassers, and you could usually pick one up on the cheap. Following the popularity of the Studebakers were the Willys Coupes. These also were never known as "hot rods", but they were just like the Studes, fairly cheap (for a while) and you could make them into a great Gasser…

A 1940 Ford coupe storms off the line at Vargo. Although the ’40 Fords made a great Gasser, they were never as popular on the drag strip as the ’40 Willys. But on the street in SoCal, it seemed for awhile like every hot rodder had a ’40 Ford Coupe. I had one, originally flathead powered, and then an Olds engine. Ran great at the track and on the road (rarely beat on the street). Then by chance in 1955, I raced a ’55 Chevy on the street. That sucker stayed with me for a block or two. 8 gases I thought it must have been a fluke and then a few weeks later, I had another go with a ’55 Chevy. Same deal. After a while I started to pay attention to those Chevy’s, especially the ones with the little "V" under the tail lights, signifying a "Power Pack" (4-brl. carb and dual exhaust). Finally, I stopped in to a local Chevy dealer and started to check it out. The salesman opened the hood and showed me the engine. I said to him, "No, not that little engine, I want to see the one that has the big V-8 under the hood." His response, "This is it, it’s the only V-8 that Chevy makes." Hmmm, my 303" Olds in my ’40 Ford just keeping up with a 265" piss-ant little engine, what is the world coming too?

I did the math. As of this date (9/8/18), I have been alive for 4,142 Sundays. I can’t even begin to count how many Sundays I have spent at San Fernando Drag Strip. I was in line when the gates opened (9:00 AM) and didn’t leave until the final round was in the books. electricity generation in usa For me, every weekend was like Christmas, Saturday at Lions in Long Beach, Sundays at "the Pond" in San Fernando, with a few Saturdays or Sundays at Santa Ana, Pomona, Fontana, Famosa, Colton, San Gabriel, Irwindale, Palmdale, Carlsbad or OCIR mixed in.

Now, about these two cars, both unknown to me. The 5-window ’32 Ford Coupe is a street car, sometimes called a hot rod. The Gas classes were originally designed for cars just like this one, a true street/strip car with the accent on street. In the other lane, a ’40 Ford DeLuxe Coupe. This appears to be someone’s race car. San Fernando Drag Strip opened in 1955, and my guess is that this photo is from that time frame. The ’40 Ford does not look like a all-out drag car, and in fact, has S.C.T.A. painted on the hood which makes me think the guy that owns this car spends more time on the local SoCal Dry Lake beds than he does at the drag strip…

One of Brad Anderson’s immaculate AA/Supercharged Gassers. This one is built around an Anglia 4-door sedan. Brad picked it up as an original Taxicab. Anglia was an interesting automobile company. It was founded by Ford Motor Company in the UK. gas in oil They built cars from 1939 through 1968 in their English factory. They became popular as Gassers after the "Willys coupe" fad kind of died down as they were smaller and lighter. The 4-door model (known as the Ford Prefect) were preferred over the 2-door sedans by many Gasser racers because the wheelbase was a little longer, and handled better.

Brad Anderson began his drag racing career in the 1960’s, in the Gasser ranks, and eventually worked his way up through Funny Cars and even Top Fuel Dragsters. As a driver, he was ferocious, a dominant race car driver. He is known today as an innovative Performance Parts Manufacturer with his billet Hemi blocks, heads, etc. But he was a race car driver first, of that there is no question. In 2001, NHRA listed Brad Anderson in the #31 position on their Top 50 Drivers of all time. Draglist puts Brad in the #33 position on their own Top 50 Driver’s list, ahead of such well known racers as Kurt Johnson, Junior Thompson, Jack Chrisman, Scott Geoffrion, Mike Dunn, Raymond Beadle, Butch Leal, Darrell Alderman, Tony Nancy, Gary Ormsby, Gary Scelzi, and others. All that and Brad is one of the nicest people that you could ever meet…

Willys Automobiles has been around for many years but the cars we most identify with Gassers have always been the Willys coupes. These cars were built between the years 1933 and 1942. Like most American auto manufacturers, new cars were not manufactured between the years 1943 and 1946. During this period, all American auto companies produced goods for the military only. Willys won the contract to build Jeeps, which basically ended their automobile production. The most popular Gasser coupes were the ones produced between 1940 and 1942. The second most popular model for Gassers were those produced between 1933 and 1936. And then there are the middle years, 1937 to 1939, such as the one in this photo. electricity deregulation Some felt these were the "ugly cars". Well, everyone to their own taste I always say. I love this particular car. First of all, it’s all steel. There is not a lightweight part on it, including the wheels. And it has roll-up windows, too. What’s not to love? There is more to life than shiny candy apple paint and polished mag wheels…