Gazpacho – wikipedia eon gas card top up

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Gazpacho has ancient roots. There are a number of theories of its origin, including as a soup of bread, olive oil, water and garlic that arrived in Spain and Portugal with the Romans and also with the addition of vinegar. [2] Once in Spain, it became a part of Andalusian cuisine, particularly Córdoba, Seville and Granada, using stale bread, garlic, olive oil, salt, and vinegar, similar to ajoblanco. [3]

There are many modern variations of gazpacho, often in different colors and omitting the tomatoes and bread in favor of avocados, cucumbers, parsley, watermelon, grapes, meat stock, seafood, and other ingredients. [4] Ingredients and preparation [ edit ]

• All the vegetables and herbs are chopped and put into a large container (alternatively, the tomatoes may be puréed in a blender or food processor, pounded in a mortar (the traditional method), or strained and de-seeded with a food mill) [4]

Traditionally, gazpacho was made by pounding the vegetables in a mortar with a pestle; this more laborious method is still sometimes used as it helps keep the gazpacho cool and avoids the foam and the completely smooth consistency created by blenders and food processors. [4] A traditional way of preparation is to pound garlic cloves in a mortar, add a little soaked stale bread, then olive oil and salt, to make a paste. Then very ripe tomatoes and vinegar are added. In the days before refrigeration the gazpacho was left in an unglazed earthenware pot to cool by evaporation, and some water added. [5]

Gazpacho may be served with garnishes, served separately, such as hard boiled eggs and chopped ham (in the salmorejo variety from Córdoba), chopped almonds, cumin crushed with mint, orange segments, finely chopped green pepper, onion, tomato or cucumber. [5] In Extremadura, gazpacho with local ham, added to the gazpacho rather than as a garnish, is called gazpacho extremeño. Andalusian sources say that gazpacho should be slightly chilled, but not iced. [5] Variations [ edit ]

The original recipe using bread, water, vinegar, oil and salt is traditional in the Iberian Peninsula, perhaps going back to Roman times. Every Andalusian region or comarca has its own variety. The humble gazpacho became a very deeply rooted food for peasants and shepherds in the south of Spain. The basic gazpacho gave rise to many variants, some also called gazpacho, others not; some authors have tried to classify all these variations. Gazpachos may be classified by colour: the most usual red ones (which contain tomato), white ones (which contain no tomato, but include dried fruits), and green ones (which are white but contain some spices that make them green). These variants have their basic ingredients in common, garlic paste which works as an emulsifier, bread, olive oil, vinegar and salt. To the traditional ingredients red fruits such as strawberries, muskmelon, etc., may be added, making the gazpacho a bit sweeter. Gazpacho may be served as a starter, main dish, or tapa. Arranque roteño [ edit ]

A popular variation comes from the town of Rota in the province of Cadiz. During times of drought there was not enough water to make gazpacho; arranque has the same ingredients as gazpacho, but uses less water and bread, making it a sort of cream. Some people add more bread until it takes on the consistency of a dip. Extremaduran variations [ edit ]

It is a meat stew, whose main ingredients are small game animals or birds such as rabbit, hare, quail, or pigeon and flat bread, [8] and may include garlic, tomatoes, and mushrooms. It is cooked in a cauldron and served hot. Garlic and tomatoes may be added. Another well-known variant in La Mancha is gazpachos de pastor or galianos.

• " Lisa the Vegetarian", an episode of The Simpsons in which Lisa offers gazpacho as an alternative to meat at the neighbourhood barbecue. Misplacing its country of origin, character Barney Gumble ridicules her by calling, "Go back to Russia!"

• In an episode of the science fiction sitcom Red Dwarf the character Arnold Rimmer relates the story of his humiliation early in his career when, having been invited to the captain’s table, he unwittingly committed a faux pas by sending his gazpacho back to the kitchen to be heated up: ‘I thought they were laughing at the chef, when all the time they were laughing at me as I ate my piping hot gazpacho soup!’ The anecdote is related at greater length in the spin-off novel Infinity Welcomes Careful Drivers.