Generation ii – bulbapedia, the community-driven pokémon encyclopedia elektricity club

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The second generation (Japanese: 第二世代 second generation) of Pokémon games, referred to as the Gold & Silver series in Pokémon Crystal’s box blurb and instruction manual, and sometimes called the metal generation or metallic generation by older players due to the names of the paired versions, is a sequel to the Generation I games Red and Green, Blue, Red and Blue, and Yellow.

Beginning with Pokémon Gold and Pokémon Silver and later joined by Pokémon Crystal, Generation II began the Pokémon series’ expansion-focused nature, introducing to the world 100 new Pokémon which did not exist and are unable to be obtained in the Generation I games, and the new region of Johto. Many of these Pokémon expand the evolution families of older Pokémon, while a majority of them are brand-new evolutionary families.

The initial hint that Generation II was on its way came in early 1997, with the release of the anime’s first episode. A Pokémon appears to Ash Ketchum on the first day of his journey, shortly after he and Pikachu become friends, that cannot be identified by the Pokédex. This magnificent golden bird, later revealed to be the Legendary mascot of Gold Version, Ho-Oh, was the first Pokémon from a future generation to debut in the anime. The games, initially named directly as "Pocket Monsters 2", were set for release in late 1997, but were pushed back to 1999 with the intention to redevelop the games to work with the Game Boy Color better.

Details in the games indicate that the storyline of the Generation II games occurs three years after the one in Generation I and Generation III, while the storyline of the Sinnoh-based Generation IV games indicate that they occur contemporaneously to Generation II as Generation I does to Generation III.

Generation II introduced a new region to the Pokémon universe, Johto, located directly west of the Kanto region featured in Generation I. Johto’s culture is notably more old-fashioned than Kanto’s, especially in the more rural areas, which are more plentiful than in Kanto. Like Kanto, it has a sea to the south and mountains to the north.

The starter Pokémon introduced in Generation II follow the same Grass- Fire- Water alignment as those of Kanto. Despite this, they are not the same trio as in Generation I. Instead, Professor Elm offers Chikorita, Cyndaquil, or Totodile to the player as protection on an errand to Mr. Pokémon’s house on Route 30.

Unlike other generations, where the first Gym is strong against the Fire-type and weak to Grass and Water, in this generation, the first Gym is strong against Grass, while Fire and Water both have an opening. Also, Pokémon available can cover for the weaknesses of the starter types very early on in the game, unlike in Generation I.

Johto’s Gym Leaders specialize in types different from Kanto’s Gym Leaders, with eight of the nine types not covered by Kanto being the specialty types of these Gyms. Like Kanto, these Gym Leaders will give out Badges and TMs on their defeat.

Unlike later games in the series, the Generation II games offer the player the chance, once Johto’s Gyms are conquered and the Elite Four is defeated, to return to the Kanto region where the Generation I games are set. Here, players will find that many things have changed over the past three years.

Pokémon Gold and Silver were among the most-hyped games in the Pokémon franchise, with the innovations introduced in them becoming staples of the series. The later-released Pokémon Crystal began the series’ focus on Legendary Pokémon of the regions in which the games take place, first bringing them into the plot of the game. Due to these improvements, Generation II is highly acclaimed among long-time fans. Unlike future games, Generation II stood as an extension and a sequel of Generation I, and has been criticized by some for this.

Like Generation I’s games, the popularity of the Generation II games proved great enough that remakes were made during Generation IV as sequels to Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen. Another reason why remakes were made was the fact that the original versions are incompatible with Generation III and onward.

The second generation of Pokémon games were more directed towards mythology and tradition. The three starters were all "pure" element types, fitting the classic Water > Grass > Fire cycle all starters adhere to. Unlike other generations, all of the Johto starters maintain their single types through their final evolutions.

This was the first installment that put emphasis on Legendary Pokémon being actual legends in-game, in contrast to Mewtwo and the Legendary birds of Generation I. Ecruteak City fleshed out the legends of Ho-Oh and the three beasts, their relationship with one another, and the story behind their departure (the Burned Tower). Lugia was also glimpsed by an elderly man in Ecruteak City, and others, who stated it looked like a dragon in the sky. Even the uncatchable Celebi was mentioned as the "Forest’s Protector" at the shrine in Ilex Forest.

The Kimono Girls upheld ancient tradition in both battling Pokémon and dancing. The buildings in both Ecruteak City and Violet City have an older structure to them as well. Kurt offered a more traditional means of creating Poké Balls via Apricorns which proved variably superior to manufactured Poké Balls.

• Unlike in other generations, should the player use a glitch or cheat in a Generation II game to get into tall grass without a Pokémon, the fight will instantly end (and be treated as a victory in case of Trainers), instead of the player sending out a glitch Pokémon.