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Get your to do list out and take some action to reduce your 2018 taxes now! Although taxpayers might be hurriedly finishing their 2017 tax returns before the e-file deadline, some tax deductions will not be there for the next tax season due to the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. (TCJA) Ultimately, the design of the new tax reform is to lower taxes for individuals of all income groups until 2025. Bear in mind that along with that idea, many individuals who itemize their deductions are worried about the tax turmoil they’ll face when filing with each capped or eliminated deduction.

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“One size fits all,” doesn’t apply when choosing your tax preparer. Take a second to imagine this scenario. John is a college student and it’s time to file his taxes for the very first time. Nerve wracking, isn’t it? He has one W-2 statement and a myriad of education expenses that surely affected his bank account. He’s unsure of where to begin and if he should simply file online or visit a tax accountant.

Whether you’re new to taxes, like John, or an experienced taxpayer, filing your tax return can be a demanding process. On top of that, you might be wondering if you should file your tax return online or go to a local tax accountant. Here are some tax tips to consider when making that decision. Online filing may be right for you.

During tax season, convenience, quality and time are both important. By filing your taxes online, you can complete a self-prepared return by opting to e-file your current year tax return or paper file your prior year return right from the comfort of your own home. Tax preparation sites require you to have: Read the rest of this entry »

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There are few calamities that compare to the damage and loss of a natural disaster. Hurricane Harvey forced thousands of residents from Texas out of their homes and left stranded without power and clean drinking water. Similarly, residents of Florida had to evacuate coastal areas due to flood zones. These events can leave families in a wreck, taking years to recover from. As horrific as these events can be, the IRS provides tax relief for taxpayers living in disaster areas.

According to the IRS, a natural disaster is a nature-related event. Usually, these events are hurricanes, floods, earthquakes, and tsunamis. However, there are more. Nonetheless, it was surprising to find mine cave-ins and sonic booms on the list! Do I qualify?

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Whether you have just one on the way or five and counting, kids are expensive. That’s why you should take advantage of tax cuts whenever possible. In addition to claiming them as dependents, you may also qualify for some other credits. One that could end up benefiting you substantially is the Additional Child Tax Credit. Let’s see if this one is for you!

You’ve probably heard of the Child Tax Credit. I’ll sum it up for those of you who don’t ( but also check out our other article which goes into more detail, “How to Claim the Child Tax Credit” ). Basically, it is a credit that can reduce your tax liability up to $1,000 per qualifying child listed on your tax return. This credit is NON-refundable, meaning that it will reduce your tax liability to $0 but will never overflow into a refund for you.

Now that we’ve covered the Child Tax Credit, you’re probably wondering what the Additional Child Tax Credit is all about, right? This is the refundable credit that will fork over the difference that you weren’t able to claim from the Child Tax Credit. Let’s take a look at an example:

Cindy and Lou have three qualifying kids listed on their joint tax return. Their tax liability is $2,500. After applying their Child Tax Credit at $1,000 per child, they were able to get their tax liability down to $0. They then figured out that they qualified for the Additional Child Tax Credit. Cindy and Lou were able to claim that additional $500 as a tax refund!

Whether it’s spending less, saving more, or just getting financially organized overall, it’s important to most of us. As we already know, taxes have a lot to do with our money goals. We’re either itching to get a hold of our tax refund or dreading paying our tax due.

Whatever the case may be for you, we’re going to help you tax charge of your financial resolutions for 2017. With the RapidTax 2016 Tax Calculator, you’ll be able to see the big picture before even looking at a confusing IRS form. How can the tax calculator 2016 help me?

Our tool allows you to take many aspects of your specific circumstances into account before filing your return. You can enter all donations, retirement income, investments, etc…for the year to see your refund increase or decrease. Then we’ll provide you with a detailed summary so that you understand our calculations. How to access the 2016 tax calculator

It’s almost too easy to navigate our calculator. You have access to different tabs. Within each tab, you’ll enter your tax information to the best of your knowledge. Remember, you can use estimated amounts if you haven’t received certain income statements yet.

The refund schedule is something that the IRS has discontinued due to accuracy issues. However, the cycle tends to be generally similar each year. It’s important to realize that these dates are not guaranteed to be accurate. They are ESTIMATES based on past tax seasons. This year does come with a few exceptions that should be taken into consideration**.