Gillette syndrome news gillettenewsrecord.com e 87 gasoline

The Vegas moved to Gillette because Joan had gotten a job as the first dental hygienist in Wyoming. Chuck had interviewed for several teaching jobs elsewhere and not been hired in the tough economy that other states were experiencing, so moving to a town that was craving teachers was a no-brainer.

In the next few years, Gillette would benefit and suffer from skyrocketing oil prices and later a coal boom that led to the construction of more a dozen mines in less than 10 years. The pressure of the growth would not ease until the bust of the mid-1980s.

They used the lack of recreation as a blank slate upon which they could build softball and baseball leagues. They created one of the first in-school suspension programs to deter students from pulling outlandish stunts in order to get thrown out of school.

Eldean Kohrs left Gillette in 1971. In 1974, he presented a paper in which he described his conclusions about the boomtown environment and coined the term. The paper by Kohrs, who could not be reached for comment, is cited in almost every mention of Gillette Syndrome.

Clinical psychologist Robert Weisz took over the Northern Wyoming Mental Health Center in Gillette when Kohrs left. Weisz ran the mental health center through the years of the most rapid growth in the oil and coal industries in the mid- to late 1970s.

Weisz co-authored a study while he was practicing in Gillette that surveyed the stressors on people living in Gillette at the time. His study, at least, confirms that those booming years were significantly more stressful on the average resident than the national norm.

Thousands of people lived in makeshift housing developments that were similar to trailer shantytowns. Sometimes they lived without water, and they often lived without a typical family infrastructure. The utter non-existence of services created an environment that bred social problems. Weisz’s study used the Holmes-Rahe Stress Scale to evaluate 215 people living in Gillette in the mid-1970s. His study showed that the people living in Gillette at the time experienced moderate to major life stress.

The image the rest of the world had of Gillette was similar to a photograph of a miner wearing a "where in the hell is Gillette Wyoming?" shirt from a 1981 National Geographic article. He is dirty, dusty and disheveled, much like the town in which he lived.

"When I topped the next hill, it became clear that whatever disagreements there are about the social fabric of Razor City, one thing is certain – it’s ugly," said an article from the March 1982 edition of Playboy. "It spills down off the pretty little hill that was the original town in long grim strips of everything you have ever seen that is quick, dirty and squat-empty of imagination or planning."

The office was supposed to be a part-time job, but ended up being more full-time for the eight years he led the city. There is no doubt Gillette would not look anything like it does today without the forward thinking of people like Enzi more than 30 years ago.

"Mark Twain could have told them what they were going to find, and they found it: murder, robbery, assault, child abuse, wife beating, divorce, alcoholism, depression, madness and suicide all out of proportion to the number of people in town. They began calling it Gillette Syndrome, and then, in the best traditions of sociology, they began to argue whether it really existed or was just a statistical aberration built of shabby data."

"The early signs are not encouraging. Towns across the Rockies are suffering from what Psychologist Eldean V. Kohrs has called the "Gillette syndrome," named after a once bucolic ranching town in northeastern Wyoming. As oil and coal developers moved in to exploit what lay underneath Gillette, the town ballooned from a population of 3,580 people in 1960 to 12,125 in 1975. House trailers crowded in among the billboards and ramshackle storefronts, water supplies dwindled, the schools bulged with students. Crime, alcoholism and violence were commonplace."

"When I topped the next hill, it became clear that whatever disagreements there are about the social fabric of Razor City, one thing is certain-it’s ugly. It spills down off the pretty little hill that was the original town in long grim strips of everything you have ever seen that is quick, dirty and squat-empty of imagination or planning."