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I’m more worried about oil capacity than I am fuel capacity. …it seems that bikes like the KTM 500 have a very small oil capacity limiting it’s use for longer runs in the back country. While there’s also fixes for that, it’d be nice to see a dedicated dual sport come with capacity in this manner to accommodate rider needs.

All fairly close to each other. The new CRF has more oil capacity than my 701 Enduro. What’s interesting to me is the recommended service intervals. The 701 Enduro is 6,200 miles. The oil change interval on the TR650 was 3000 miles. The Honda XR650L is 1000 miles. The DRZ is 3000 miles if my memory is correct. In other words – they all have similar amounts of oil but vastly different oil change recommendations.

So, for typical use, the oil range of the 500 is easily within my normal riding habits. If I were planning a trip much more than 1000 miles but less than 2000miles, I would probably just buy some oil in a town along the way and change it in the parking lot of an auto parts store, not worrying about the oil filter until the trip was over. I’m not sure where I would choose the 500 for a ride longer than 2000 miles.

So, for typical use, the oil range of the 500 is easily within my normal riding habits. If I were planning a trip much more than 1000 miles but less than 2000miles, I would probably just buy some oil in a town along the way and change it in the parking lot of an auto parts store, not worrying about the oil filter until the trip was over. I’m not sure where I would choose the 500 for a ride longer than 2000 miles.

My 530 EXC holds .9 in the engine and .9 in the tranny. I can’t recall what the hours/miles service interval in the manual is. I don’t worry about it. I am not racing the bike. I typically just change it before each trip I do, which may run 1000 miles to 1500 miles. I think the longest I did was around 1800 miles. If I am not doing any trips, I change it once a year because I just don’t put that many miles on it. I run synthetic oil in it. I have to top it off a tiny bit each day on trips because mine has always used a wee bit of oil if I run 200+ miles a day with some high speed highway mixed in there (new piston rings did not solve the issue). So I carry a metal MSR bottle with 1 liter of oil. I might use 1/4 of that over the course of a six day trip. If I were going to be doing an extended trip, like down to the end of South America and back, I’d probably change it on average every 2000 miles. When I do change the oil, it comes out slightly darker but clean (no metal flakes, etc,…).

The reality nowadays with modern oils is that the service intervals are likely much shorter than they need to be unless you are seeing extreme service. Oil is relatively cheap. You can be sure that the engineers are being VERY conservative with their service intervals on oil changes. I would be far more concerned about keeping my air filter clean to keep crap out of the motor.

The ability to put a bigger gas tank on the bike is a big issue. I want 200+ miles on a tank RELIABLY as a minimum. IF you are trail riding, that might seem extreme. If you are adventure riding out in the middle of nowhere, that can get a bit tight. I have a 300 mile range on my 530 EXC with an Acerbis 6.6 gallon tank on the bike. That has come in very handy on more than one occasion.

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