Grinder water closets – peachparts mercedes shopforum gas jobs pittsburgh

One of my clients has an outdoor kitchen that his brother in law from Poland built. Not bad, but has some oddball features. Provided me a lot of work when the electricity went south. He had the Romex coming out of concrete. Just ran it into the form and brought it out under the sink to take off from there. Only problem when the wires are held fast in concretew, any movement is absolute at that point – no give – and they had already started to break before the job was done I think, as they went completely south on me and there was no fixing it. They should have been in plastic conduit inside the concrete. I had rewire half of it all over.

I’ll bet to really satisfy code you’d have to dump it into a main 3 or 4 inch toilet line on the other side of all vent connections. But that could be major work. I think going into a vent will work now and then. Your stuff has been made OK for 2 inch so who knows? But I think you would need to find a connection lower to the ground. Might need to sleuth it out and open a wall. Going to the attic and sending it downhill from there could have unexpected problems in the mix.

One of my clients has an outdoor kitchen that his brother in law from Poland built. Not bad, but has some oddball features. Provided me a lot of work when the electricity went south. He had the Romex coming out of concrete. Just ran it into the form and brought it out under the sink to take off from there. Only problem when the wires are held fast in concretew, any movement is absolute at that point – no give – and they had already started to break before the job was done I think, as they went completely south on me and there was no fixing it. They should have been in plastic conduit inside the concrete. I had rewire half of it all over.

I’ll bet to really satisfy code you’d have to dump it into a main 3 or 4 inch toilet line on the other side of all vent connections. But that could be major work. I think going into a vent will work now and then. Your stuff has been made OK for 2 inch so who knows? But I think you would need to find a connection lower to the ground. Might need to sleuth it out and open a wall. Going to the attic and sending it downhill from there could have unexpected problems in the mix.

Like a lot of code regs, there’s some over-engineering built in. Is a good thing for the most part but for various reasons at times you really want to do what will be adequate to work, but less than fully code legal. I’m doing a bathroom remodel now, was made twice as big, the new vanity is 8 feet away from prior plumbing and this is on a slab.

I also needed to spin the toilet 90 degrees, and to get optimal distance from both walls (in a corner) I needed to move the drain back and over a couple of inches. It made the most sense to tie into the toilet line for other reasons, and the need to move the toilet made it a no brainer. I found out however that hooking into the closet arm (the J shaped piece leading away from the toilet before it passes under the vent) is a no-no.

Most were down on the idea. When I suggested that I up the drain from the sink, and vent servicing that drain (tied over to the main vent up above) to 2 inches from 1.5 one guy said he thought that would work if I turned the inlet on the Y fitting into the closet arm up 45 degrees. I gather that the problem with hooking it that way is that flushing the toilet can create a vacuum that will suck the water out of the sink trap.

I hooked all of my stuff up (the client wanted the toilet hooked back up for my use so I wouldn’t be using the tenant’s toilet (he has two housemates) so this gave a great chance to observe matters before covering it up with a tile floor. I installed the old toilet and put in a cheapo 1-1/4 plastic trap on the sink drain fitting. Sure enough, when flushing the toilet the water in the trap would move up and down some but was not pulled out. I suspect my improved venting helped.

Here’s my thread on that, maybe the forum could be useful to you. Shortly after I joined they switched to a different format, advertising now dominates half the page. I could swear participation dropped off. I don’t like it much. Still usable but …

I found this was really problematic and intermittent on occasion so hard to establish. Typical on septic systems where the tanks fluid level increases because the field is too slow to drain. Usually because the people have increased the system loading periodically. I have had to improve the systems field capacity.

Since both toilets are acting up I would want to establish where the two lines meet anywhere before they discharge into the city system. Then examine beyond that. Looking for high water. Although as mentioned if this is intermittent it can be hard to find.

You might ask the city to examine their main line. Especially if it is a freebee. I suspect there is no regular need normally to clean or check it. Unless a possible complaint is received. Your plumbers seem to have found nothing really signifigant so far. If the main street line is older the city department may also have history on it.

People will be putting toilets out curbside for the spring cleanup soon. Enough of them each year with many being not that old. Things stuck in their traps is my probable assessment on many of them. Floating plastic toys or objects in the traps can drive the owners of them crazy.