Groups to sue ben carson over delay of anti-segregation rule static electricity how it works

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HUD said in January that it would immediately stop reviewing plans that had been submitted but not yet accepted, and that jurisdictions won’t have to comply with the rule until after 2020. The agency said the postponement was in response to complaints from communities that had struggled to complete assessments and produce plans meeting HUD’s standards; of the 49 submissions HUD received in 2017, roughly a third were sent back.

"What we heard convinced us that the Assessment of Fair Housing tool for local governments wasn’t working well," HUD said in a statement. "In fact, more than a third of our early submitters failed to produce an acceptable assessment_not for lack of trying but because the tool designed to help them to succeed wasn’t helpful."

Attorney Michael Allen said Carson’s action "tells every opponent of integration, every opponent of affordable housing and good neighborhoods, whether they’re individuals or elected officials or local governments, that nobody will put pressure on them at the HUD level for the foreseeable future."

"The rule that was put into place was adopted after careful thought and consideration, and expensive input from the public, and time after time we are seeing this administration violate the requirements of the Administrative Procedure Act," said Kristen Clarke, president and executive director of the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, whose firm is involved in the suit. "Secretary Ben Carson is abdicating his responsibility to fulfill HUD’s mission."

Claudia Monterrosa, director of public policy and planning at the Los Angeles Housing and Community Investment Department, said that although the process proved to be a tremendous amount of work, it was immeasurably valuable for the city’s progress.

"The biggest takeaway for our city is, we had a chance to have an honest conversation about race, poverty concentration and investment, addressing the affordable housing crisis through a fair housing lens," Monterrosa said. HUD suspended the rule one day before Los Angeles expected its plan to be approved, she said.

Paul Chrystie, a spokesman for Philadelphia’s Division of Housing and Community Development, said the city’s examination of segregation extended far beyond housing to include its education and transportation systems. "It helped us think outside of our bubble," he said.

Among the plans HUD sent back was one from Hidalgo County, Texas. Historically, the county has ignored the needs of poor communities living in colonias, rural communities within the U.S.-Mexico border region that lack basic infrastructure such as electricity and running water.

HUD said in January that it would immediately stop reviewing plans that had been submitted but not yet accepted, and that jurisdictions won’t have to comply with the rule until after 2020. The agency said the postponement was in response to complaints from communities that had struggled to complete assessments and produce plans meeting HUD’s standards; of the 49 submissions HUD received in 2017, roughly a third were sent back.

"What we heard convinced us that the Assessment of Fair Housing tool for local governments wasn’t working well," HUD said in a statement. "In fact, more than a third of our early submitters failed to produce an acceptable assessment_not for lack of trying but because the tool designed to help them to succeed wasn’t helpful."

Attorney Michael Allen said Carson’s action "tells every opponent of integration, every opponent of affordable housing and good neighborhoods, whether they’re individuals or elected officials or local governments, that nobody will put pressure on them at the HUD level for the foreseeable future."

"The rule that was put into place was adopted after careful thought and consideration, and expensive input from the public, and time after time we are seeing this administration violate the requirements of the Administrative Procedure Act," said Kristen Clarke, president and executive director of the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, whose firm is involved in the suit. "Secretary Ben Carson is abdicating his responsibility to fulfill HUD’s mission."

Claudia Monterrosa, director of public policy and planning at the Los Angeles Housing and Community Investment Department, said that although the process proved to be a tremendous amount of work, it was immeasurably valuable for the city’s progress.

"The biggest takeaway for our city is, we had a chance to have an honest conversation about race, poverty concentration and investment, addressing the affordable housing crisis through a fair housing lens," Monterrosa said. HUD suspended the rule one day before Los Angeles expected its plan to be approved, she said.

Paul Chrystie, a spokesman for Philadelphia’s Division of Housing and Community Development, said the city’s examination of segregation extended far beyond housing to include its education and transportation systems. "It helped us think outside of our bubble," he said.

Among the plans HUD sent back was one from Hidalgo County, Texas. Historically, the county has ignored the needs of poor communities living in colonias, rural communities within the U.S.-Mexico border region that lack basic infrastructure such as electricity and running water.