Guide-temperature-control – vapeheads electricity bill

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With temperature control, the user sets wattage or joules, which limits temperature ramp-up; and temperature limit, which determines the maximum temperature which a coil will reach. The benefits are that dry hits and burning cotton can be avoided and that the flavor of your juice can be fine-tuned by changing the temperature.

Traditional temperature control, used in the DNA40, DNA200, SX350J and v2, and many other chipsets, functions by reading the resistance of the coil while firing, measuring 0.001Ω or smaller increments. Innokin ATC (Advanced Temperature Control) functions by using an atomizer with an installed thermocouple and requires use of their freely available connection specifications.

Because traditional temperature control requires relatively large changes in resistance as temperature increases, the TCR of the wire must be relatively high. TCR is a value that determines at what rate the resistance will rise relative to temperature. TCR and baseline resistance (for vaping, we generally measure from 20⁰C) determine the actual resistance change, so an Ni200 coil with a temperature of 0.1Ω at 20⁰C would have a resistance of 0.13486Ω at 100⁰C and a resistance of 0.165365 at 150⁰C with a TCR of 0.0006087. The TCR will vary depending on the temperature, so for utmost accuracy, use a DNA200 or any other device that uses user-configurable TCR curves instead of one that simply adjusts TCR as a static value (Smok X-Cube II, Smok Tree Mod, SXK DNA clones, Apollo Reliant, Dicodes 2380T, others). The more common chipsets that allow TCR adjustment adjust in different ways: for some, you input the actual numerical value; while for others you must translate that into their own 1-100 scale.

Let’s say we’re vaping on a 304SS coil with a base resistance reading 0.150Ω, while taking a pull the chip sees the resistance has changed to 0.193Ω (Rounded from 0.19266Ω), by using a little math we can determine by what factor the resistance has changed and thus determine the temperature.

With temperature control, the user sets wattage or joules, which limits temperature ramp-up; and temperature limit, which determines the maximum temperature which a coil will reach. The benefits are that dry hits and burning cotton can be avoided and that the flavor of your juice can be fine-tuned by changing the temperature.

Traditional temperature control, used in the DNA40, DNA200, SX350J and v2, and many other chipsets, functions by reading the resistance of the coil while firing, measuring 0.001Ω or smaller increments. [Innokin ATC](https://www.reddit.com/r/Innokin/comments/3gzy3x/innokin_atc_megathread_stickied_for_your/) (Advanced Temperature Control) functions by using an atomizer with an installed thermocouple and requires use of their freely available connection specifications.

Because traditional temperature control requires relatively large changes in resistance as temperature increases, the [TCR](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Temperature_coefficient#Temperature_coefficient_of_electrical_resistance) of the wire must be relatively high. TCR is a value that determines at what rate the resistance will rise relative to temperature. TCR and baseline resistance (for vaping, we generally measure from 20⁰C) determine the actual resistance change, so an Ni200 coil with a temperature of 0.1Ω at 20⁰C would have a resistance of 0.13486Ω at 100⁰C and a resistance of 0.165365 at 150⁰C with a TCR of 0.0006087. The TCR will vary depending on the temperature, so for utmost accuracy, use a DNA200 or any other device that uses user-configurable TCR curves instead of one that simply adjusts TCR as a static value (Smok X-Cube II, Smok Tree Mod, SXK DNA clones, Apollo Reliant, Dicodes 2380T, others). The more common chipsets that allow TCR adjustment adjust in different ways: for some, you input the actual numerical value; while for others you must translate that into their own 1-100 scale.

A good resource for finding TC of various alloys as well as more non-nickel wire alloys to vape with is [this thread](https://www.e-cigarette-forum.com/forum/threads/tc-beyond-ni200-nickel-purity-dicodes-ti-ss-resistherm-nife30-coefficient-of-resistance.676506/) and [this post in particular](https://www.e-cigarette-forum.com/forum/threads/tc-beyond-ni200-nickel-purity-dicodes-ti-ss-resistherm-nife30-coefficient-of-resistance.676506/page-75#post-16466964). Another useful resource is [Steam-Engine](http://www.steam-engine.org/wirewiz.asp#)’s Wire Wizard feature.

Let’s say we’re vaping on a 304SS coil with a base resistance reading 0.150Ω, while taking a pull the chip sees the resistance has changed to 0.193Ω (Rounded from 0.19266Ω), by using a little math we can determine by what factor the resistance has changed and thus determine the temperature.