Hawaii center for volcanology home electricity transmission efficiency

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How active? Mauna Loa is one of Earth’s most active volcanoes. Since 1843 it has erupted 33 times producting lavas that have covered over 800 km 2. The image at right shows Mauna Loa lava flows since 1832 (warm colors) overlain on a 3-d digital elevation model. The view is looking towards the west, with Hilo qt the bottom center, Kilauea at left, and Kona coast on the north. Learn all about the hazards associated with this eruption history at the HVO website

The summit of Mauna Loa began inflating slowly between 2002 and 2005 after a decade of slight deflation, after experiencing a brief swarm of deep long-period earthquakes. Inflation wasn’t constant, with slowdowns in winter 2002-2003, Spring 2003, and since sept 2005.

But, inflation was fairly steady in 2004 and the first half of 2005 following a more intense swarm of several thousand deep earthquakesin late 2004, all of which suggested that the magma reservoir within the volcano was swelling. Then inflation slowed again in 2006, ceased in late 2009, and resumed slowly in late 2010, continuing through mid-2015 (i.e., to date). Im late Aug 2015, HVO raised the alter level at Mauna Loa because of long-term increased seismicity rates and inflation of the summit (as measured by cross-caldera difference). This doesn’t mean an eruption is imminent, but signs are consistent with magma entering the shallow part of the magmatic system at the volcano.

Earthquakes activity increased in early July 2004 and continued through Fall 2004, but then slowed significantly throughout 2005 and remained at a level of about 10 a week. Activity peaked in Sept. 2004 (for instance, there were more than 350 "long-period" earthquakes beneath Mauna Loa’s summit and the upper southwest rift zone during the first week of that month, most which were deep (35 to 50 km) below the ground surface).

That earthquake swarm was the greatest number of such earthquales since the beginning of the modern HVO earthquake catalog in the 1960s. HVO scientists continue to monitor the volcano closely. In an HVO press release on 26 Mar 2009, Frank Trusdell, an HVO geologist who has

studied the volcano for nearly two decades, is quoted as saying that "Mauna Loa will erupt again, and there’s a good chance that it will be during your lifetime." He and others are interesting in alerting Big Island of Hawaii residents about how to live safely and be aware of the potential hazards posed by Mauna Loa.

How active? Mauna Loa is one of Earth’s most active volcanoes. Since 1843 it has erupted 33 times producting lavas that have covered over 800 km 2. The image at right shows Mauna Loa lava flows since 1832 (warm colors) overlain on a 3-d digital elevation model. The view is looking towards the west, with Hilo qt the bottom center, Kilauea at left, and Kona coast on the north. Learn all about the hazards associated with this eruption history at the HVO website

The summit of Mauna Loa began inflating slowly between 2002 and 2005 after a decade of slight deflation, after experiencing a brief swarm of deep long-period earthquakes. Inflation wasn’t constant, with slowdowns in winter 2002-2003, Spring 2003, and since sept 2005.

But, inflation was fairly steady in 2004 and the first half of 2005 following a more intense swarm of several thousand deep earthquakesin late 2004, all of which suggested that the magma reservoir within the volcano was swelling. Then inflation slowed again in 2006, ceased in late 2009, and resumed slowly in late 2010, continuing through mid-2015 (i.e., to date). Im late Aug 2015, HVO raised the alter level at Mauna Loa because of long-term increased seismicity rates and inflation of the summit (as measured by cross-caldera difference). This doesn’t mean an eruption is imminent, but signs are consistent with magma entering the shallow part of the magmatic system at the volcano.

Earthquakes activity increased in early July 2004 and continued through Fall 2004, but then slowed significantly throughout 2005 and remained at a level of about 10 a week. Activity peaked in Sept. 2004 (for instance, there were more than 350 "long-period" earthquakes beneath Mauna Loa’s summit and the upper southwest rift zone during the first week of that month, most which were deep (35 to 50 km) below the ground surface).

That earthquake swarm was the greatest number of such earthquales since the beginning of the modern HVO earthquake catalog in the 1960s. HVO scientists continue to monitor the volcano closely. In an HVO press release on 26 Mar 2009, Frank Trusdell, an HVO geologist who has

studied the volcano for nearly two decades, is quoted as saying that "Mauna Loa will erupt again, and there’s a good chance that it will be during your lifetime." He and others are interesting in alerting Big Island of Hawaii residents about how to live safely and be aware of the potential hazards posed by Mauna Loa.