Hefty-g cultivating tractor – diy electric car forums j gastroenterology impact factor

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The Hefty-G is a late 1970s copy/homage to the 1950s era Allis Chalmers model G which was, I think, the first small cultivating tractor in North America to move the engine aft of the operator, thus freeing up the space between front and rear axles for belly-mounted tools for precision work like seeding, weeding, hilling, etc. A brilliant re-think of the standard tractor configuration aimed primarily at vegetable growers before the advent of chemical weed control.

Fast forward 50+ years and these old tractors are being dug out impact of electricity in the 1920s of barns and put back into service on organic vegetable farms like ours where they continue to ably perform the tasks they were designed for. Well, with the possible exceptions of starting reliably and running smoothly without constant breakdowns. Luckily these problems are all easily resolved by throwing out the ICE and replacing with a suitable electric motor.

The Hefty-G is perhaps tortugas ninjas the easiest conversion project anyone could ever find. It was built out of pieces, almost zero integration, and everything just bolts together. They were turned out by a smallish concern in Wisconsin – the Holtan Axle Co. or Haxco – which built gearboxes and diffs and decided to try their hand at copying and updating the venerable Allis G. They did a great job in many respects but the rebadged Renault engine supplied by Continental Teledyne hasn’t aged gracefully or made any friends at our farm of late. Nor are parts available. I guess I can thank the little bugger for motivating me to extract it this winter rather than trying to wait another year.

The motor I found was rebuilt and shelved. Looks super clean and flawless and wasn’t too electricity flows through expensive. AMD 203-02-4004 badged as Raymond, pulled from a lift, probably a standup 3-wheeler. It’s a sepex/shunt motor which is fine because I found a big 600A General Electric sepex controller at a fair price on eBay. I may not even reverse the motor so it being sepex is not necessary but the price was right so there we are.

The AMD motor is 8 diameter, approx 14 long and is similar to one whic forum member Boekel used in a boat but now I can’t find the thread. I’m planning to run it at 48V using a battery bank of Chevy Volt modules, probably 4P12S. I don’t need tons of runtime or load as the tractor is primarily used for weeding, a couple hours at a time, and it’s geared-down like crazy. It is not a tillage tractor and was ably powered by a wheezy old 20-odd HP gas engine with all of 800cc of displacement and a centrifugal governor. Good riddance to that particular piece of tech

The motor also has the advantage of having a tailshaft that should let me keep my original open center hydraulics with no modification (pump shown in mockup pics). I think I’ll have two throttle pots in parallel if that’s feasible, one foot and one hand throttle. I’ll keep the clutch so that when I want to stop the tractor but keep spinning the pump for hydraulic flow I’ll just depress the clutch with my left foot and spin up the motor with my right.

Don’t be confused by the cylinder cradle and propane hoses on the right side fender. The tractor was tgas advisors not propane powered. That gear is all part of the flamethrower… sorry, the flame weeder mounted at the very front gas efficient suv 2014 of the machine. It’s a totally valid and accepted technique for killing certain weeds at certain times, even in organic systems… honest It’s fun for lighting campfires too flame weeder demo on youtube.

Since last entry I finished fettling all the bits of the driveline. Clutch, transmission and diff were all dismantled, cleaned and rebuilt with new bearings and seals wherever appropriate. brakes and output shafts to the final drives too while it was in parts. Finally some steering repairs to replace an utterly pooched U-joint and inspect and rebuild the steering gear box with new seals and lube.

Having finally set up my lathe in the fall, learned at least the rudiments of turning and acquired a handful of tools, I was able to finish making a drive hub to fit my motor’s tapered keyed output shaft. It came out well and seemed to fit the motor perfectly but now that I spin it up I can see a tiny bit of runout and I’m not sure where it comes from. I’m pretty sure it’ll be within the tolerances of the rubber donut drives in the first part of the output shaft so I’m not going to sweat it for now. One of the pics shows how I cut a keyway on the lathe after turning the inside tapered bore. I set up a 6mm wide origin electricity account HSS parting tool on it’s side in the toolholder and then ran it in and out with the compound rest slide, gradually scratching a thou at a time. It probably took 15 minutes but that’s fine with me. The hub part is cast iron and it turned out really nice as far as I’m concerned.

The Hefty-G is a late 1970s copy/homage to the 1950s era Allis Chalmers model G which was, I think, the first small cultivating tractor in North America to move the engine aft of the operator, thus freeing up the space between front and rear axles for belly-mounted tools for precision work like seeding, weeding, hilling, etc. A brilliant re-think of the standard tractor configuration aimed primarily at vegetable growers before the advent of chemical weed control.

Fast forward 50+ years and these old tractors are being dug out of barns and put back into gas 85 service on organic vegetable farms like ours where they continue to ably perform the tasks they were designed for. Well, with the possible exceptions of starting reliably and running smoothly without constant breakdowns. Luckily these problems are all easily resolved by throwing out the ICE and replacing with a suitable gas monkey cast electric motor.

The Hefty-G is perhaps the easiest conversion project anyone could ever find. It was built out of pieces, almost zero integration, and everything just bolts together. They were turned out by a smallish concern in Wisconsin – the Holtan Axle Co. or Haxco – which built gearboxes and diffs and decided to try their hand at copying and updating the venerable Allis G. They did a great job in many respects but the rebadged Renault engine supplied by Continental Teledyne hasn’t aged gracefully or made any friends at our farm of late. Nor are parts available. I guess I can thank the little bugger for motivating me to extract it this winter rather than trying to wait another year.

The motor I found was rebuilt and shelved. Looks super clean and flawless and wasn’t too expensive. AMD 203-02-4004 badged as Raymond, pulled from a lift, probably a standup 3-wheeler. It’s a sepex/shunt motor which is fine because I found a big 600A General Electric sepex controller at a fair gas oil ratio 50 to 1 price on eBay. I may not even reverse the motor so it being sepex is not necessary but the price was right so there we are.

The AMD motor is 8 diameter, approx 14 long and is similar to one whic forum member Boekel used in a boat but now I can’t find the thread. I’m planning to run it at 48V using a battery bank of Chevy Volt modules, probably 4P12S. I don’t need tons of runtime or load as the tractor is primarily used for weeding, a couple hours at a time, and it’s geared-down like crazy. It is not a tillage tractor and was ably powered by a wheezy old 20-odd HP gas engine with all of 800cc of displacement and a centrifugal governor. Good riddance to that particular piece of tech

The motor also has the advantage of having a tailshaft that should let me keep my original open center hydraulics with no modification (pump shown in mockup pics). I think I’ll have two throttle pots in parallel if that’s feasible, one foot and one hand throttle. I’ll keep the clutch so that when I want to stop the tractor but keep spinning the pump for hydraulic flow I’ll just depress the clutch with my left electricity billy elliot karaoke with lyrics foot and spin up the motor with my right.

Don’t be confused by the cylinder cradle and propane hoses on the right side fender. The tractor was not propane powered. That gear is all part of the flamethrower… sorry, the flame weeder mounted at the very front of the machine. It’s a totally valid and accepted technique for killing certain weeds at certain times, even in organic systems… honest It’s fun for lighting campfires too flame weeder demo on youtube.

Since last entry I finished fettling all the bits of the driveline 4 gas giants. Clutch, transmission and diff were all dismantled, cleaned and rebuilt with new bearings and seals wherever appropriate. brakes and output shafts to the final drives too while it was in parts. Finally some steering repairs to replace an utterly pooched U-joint and inspect and rebuild the steering gear box with new seals and lube.

Having finally set up my lathe in the fall, learned at least the rudiments of turning and acquired a handful of tools, I was able to finish making a drive hub to fit my motor’s tapered keyed output shaft. It came out well and seemed to fit the motor perfectly but now that I spin it up I can see a tiny bit of runout and I’m not sure where it comes from. I’m pretty sure it’ll be within the tolerances of the rubber donut drives in the first part of the output shaft so I’m not going to sweat it for now. One of the pics shows how I cut a keyway on the lathe after turning the inside tapered bore. I set up a 6mm wide HSS parting tool on it’s side in the toolholder and then ran it in and out with the compound rest slide, gradually scratching a thou at a time. It probably took 15 minutes but that’s fine with me. The hub part is cast iron and it turned out really nice as far as I’m concerned n game.