Higher power supply wattage uses more electricity – components grade 9 electricity

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A 1000watt power supply ALWAYS draws more than a 400W. Depending on how efficient the power supply is the less power it draws. For example a 80plus Gold certified power supply has a very good 90% efficiency so it draws 10% more than 1000Watts of the grid. 1100Watts in other words. It needs to draw 1100Watts to deliver 1000Watts. The same goes for a 400Watt PSU. It needs for example 450Watts to deliver 400 Watt. So a 1000Watt PSU draws roughly double the power of the grid constantly than a 500 Watt even though it is not used and usually disapates as heat or vibration. because PSU’s are more efficient in a sweet spot, then you are not wrong. A larger PSU will be effectively slightly underloaded and so in an attempt to provide 300W might need to pull 340, a 400 PSU might only need to pull 320 provide 300. So a vastly oversized PSU will therefore be slightly more innefficient, but the difference is small, certainly much less than the cost of 2 PSU over a couple of builds. Your last sentence is utter rubbish, in the context of a PC needing a certain amount of power i.e. 350W then the 1000W psu does not draw double the 400W PSU.

its just an estimate to get the point across thats all… jeez calm down…. the 450w system is the base line in that it actually takes 450w without any efficiency modification… which i guess is where you think im making a mistake… so in my model the pc will take 450w and waste 20% as heat/noise (thus my 450w+20%) and so on which give the end result on the 600w psu then i apply the same method to the 1000w psu. but i take into account the the point where the 450w appears on the 1000w efficiency curve .. the pc will still draw 450w but because the 1000w psu’s eficentcy curve will be different and will reach 80% at a higher wattage thus i applied a 30% aditional power to represent this… im taking the fact that efficiency builds on a curve the more power you use in relation to the size of the psu if there both rated at 80+ my numbers are just typical examples nothing more… so no i dont think my mental model is off, my math maybe. but not the idea behind it… gimme a few and il post a graph that may explain it better as im dyslexic and that may be hampering me more than i think.

Does having a super high wattage power supply use more electricity than a less powerful one? Example: 1000 watt power supply vs a 400 watt power supply. Let’s say the computer only uses about 350 watt max. A 1000watt power supply ALWAYS draws more than a 400W. Depending on how efficient the power supply is the less power it draws. For example a 80plus Gold certified power supply has a very good 90% efficiency so it draws 10% more than 1000Watts of the grid. 1100Watts in other words. It needs to draw 1100Watts to deliver 1000Watts. The same goes for a 400Watt PSU. It needs for example 450Watts to deliver 400 Watt. So a 1000Watt PSU draws roughly double the power of the grid constantly than a 500 Watt even though it is not used and usually disapates as heat or vibration. Watt is the measure of the efficiency of power. AS much watt an electric device has, as much electricity it will consume to operate. A device with 1000 watt power will consume double electricity than a device of 500watt. I have prepaid electricity meter installed in my house and I can track daily electricity uses easily, that’s how I know this.

A 1000watt power supply ALWAYS draws more than a 400W. Depending on how efficient the power supply is the less power it draws. For example a 80plus Gold certified power supply has a very good 90% efficiency so it draws 10% more than 1000Watts of the grid. 1100Watts in other words. It needs to draw 1100Watts to deliver 1000Watts. The same goes for a 400Watt PSU. It needs for example 450Watts to deliver 400 Watt. So a 1000Watt PSU draws roughly double the power of the grid constantly than a 500 Watt even though it is not used and usually disapates as heat or vibration. because PSU’s are more efficient in a sweet spot, then you are not wrong. A larger PSU will be effectively slightly underloaded and so in an attempt to provide 300W might need to pull 340, a 400 PSU might only need to pull 320 provide 300. So a vastly oversized PSU will therefore be slightly more innefficient, but the difference is small, certainly much less than the cost of 2 PSU over a couple of builds. Your last sentence is utter rubbish, in the context of a PC needing a certain amount of power i.e. 350W then the 1000W psu does not draw double the 400W PSU. it will only be slightly more inefficient when idling, but it will more than compensate with better efficiency under full load