How 6 handy utensils ended up on our placemats mental floss gas engineer salary

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Chopsticks evolved in China during the Chou dynasty, not due to fashion but mostly because of the nation’s poverty at the time. While starvation was a big problem, the land did i gas shares have plenty of water for rice farming, so the country’s forests were cleared in favor of agriculture. As a result, firewood became a luxury item, and culinary trends reflected the need for shorter cooking times. For example, instead of boiling or baking large items, cooks chopped their ingredients into small pieces that could be stir-fried quickly.

No wood for fires also meant no wood for tables, so in order to eat, people had to be able to hold their food bowl while eating with the other hand. An expert chopsticks user could pick up small bits of meat, vegetables, and rice without ever touching the utensils to his or her lips—making the chopsticks more sanitary and pleasing to even the most fastidious of diners.

While eating in a Chinese restaurant, you may have received wooden chopsticks from gas evolution reaction time to time, which appears to break the no-wood pattern the Chinese were aiming for. But there’s a simple explanation for this seeming anachronism: during the Chou dynasty, chopsticks were traditionally made of non-wooden materials like bamboo, ivory, or bone. 2. SPOONS

Strangely enough, spoons are the utensil most found in nature and therefore predate their rival, the fork. From sea shells to gourds, to sections of bamboo and wood, spoons appeared in many forms in every region. The shapes ranged from mini-bowls in seacoast areas to flat, paddle-like objects used by American Indians in the Pacific Northwest.

Despite the difference of materials, it’s highly probable that the Anglo spoon was influenced by the Southern European version. The Romans designed two spoons in the first century CE: (1) a ligula, which sported a pointed oval bowl and decorative handle electricity water analogy, for soups and soft foods and (2) a cochleare, a small spoon with a round bowl and pointed handle, for shellfish and eggs. When the Romans occupied Britain, they likely brought their cutlery, inspiring the English design. 3. FORKS

Sure, forks are handy, but they were once counted as the most scandalous of utensils. One legend tells that the fork got its start in Europe during eur j gastroenterology hepatology impact factor the superstitious Middle Ages. In the 11th century, a Byzantium princess flouted her delicate, two-tined golden fork at her wedding to Domenico Selvo, son of the Venetian Doge. The Venetian clergy had clearly stated their k electric share price forecast position on the subject: God provided humans with natural forks (i.e., fingers) and it was an insult to his design to use a metal version. Moreover, fork use represented excessive delicacy, which was apparently very bad. When the princess died shortly after her wedding, people didn’t look to natural causes (or even fork injury). They assumed the death must be divine punishment.

Somehow, fork use still spread through Europe over the next 500 years, and despite the wishes of the clergy, it was considered an Italian affectation in Northern Europe. Part of the bad rap came from, again, the prissy factor. Although the fork’s functional value is similar to a spoon nowadays, the first forks originally evolved from the knife. Aristocrats would use one knife to cut the food and a second to spear and eat it. The two gas mask tattoo- and four-pronged knife substitutes must have looked as overwrought as a double-layer dinner fork would seem to us today. 4. KNIVES

Well, Louis XIV for one. Until Louis’s time, the knives used to cut and eat dinner were sharply pointed—after all, they had to spear food as well as cut it. But no one forgot that they also doubled as weapons. This meant that dining experiences could be a little uncomfortable, as the dining utensil represented a threat of danger at any moment, even under seemingly friendly circumstances.

When the fork gained popularity in Europe, the need for a pointed knife at the table lessened, and that’s where Louis came in. In 1669, the French king ruled all pointed knives at the dinner tables r gas constant kj to be illegal. As such, the utensils were ground down to prevent violence. The blunt and wider knives became popular in America, too, though the fork was rarely imported there. As a result, European and American dining customs evolved somewhat differently. 5. SPORKS

Ah, the spork. Our favorite utensil: perfect for scooping up ice cream and spearing pie without dirtying extra cutlery. As its name indicates, the spork is half-spoon, half-fork, and while America was clearly behind on the other cutlery trends, the spork is a true American eating utensil. First mentioned by name in a 1909 supply catalog, the spork achieved notoriety through another American original—Kentucky electricity and circuits Fried Chicken. Back in 1970, KFC started including plastic sporks with their meals as a cheap convenience, and the Van Brode Milling Company of Massachusetts patented the invention for their combination plastic spoon, fork, and knife the same year. Due to its handy nature, the spork eventually became a common dessert and travel utensil, available in silver and other metals. 6. ONE MORE: THE SPLADE

Sorry, lazy home cooks: You really do need to wash your fruits and vegetables before you eat them. Rinsing produce thoroughly removes up to 90 percent of harmful pathogens, but between dirtying a colander, using up water, and inevitably spilling some food in the sink, it’s also b games unblocked a huge pain. Equilibric, a combination food strainer/serving bowl—currently raising money on Kickstarter—makes the process a lot simpler.

Instead of using a separate colander and bowl to prepare a meal, this hybrid kitchen item saves you a step. If you’re washing fruits, vegetables, beans, or grains, just add your ingredients to the Equilibric colander, fill it with water, and use the handle to pour out the liquid into the sink. As the water flows from the bowl, it rinses the food inside the colander. According to Equilibric, this method uses the 60 percent less water gas key bolt carrier than traditional strainers and washes away twice as many contaminants.

For straining ingredients that have already been cooked, like pasta, the product works the same way. And when your food is strained, you can serve it straight from the bowl instead of transferring it to a new vessel. It can also act as a defrosting bowl electricity online games. When you have frozen items that need to come up to room temperature, just place them in the colander—the bowl will collect any water that accumulates and make for easy clean-up.

Peeps: You either love them or hate them. If you fall into the former camp, you might be able to sate your sweet tooth while serving a good cause. For a limited time, donors who make a $5 contribution to the United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley (UWGLV) will receive a chance to win a trip electricity projects for grade 6 for four people to the Peeps factory in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. In addition to an exclusive tour, the winner will receive $250 to spend at the Peeps and Company Store. Airfare and accommodations will also be covered.

The contest is appropriately called the Peeps Helping Peeps Sweepstakes. The donations will go toward funding school scholarships, mental health services, and other educational programs for local students. For each $5 donation, you’ll receive a chance to win a rare look at how the Easter candy gets made. Like Willy Wonka’s fictional candy factory, the Peeps factory has never before welcomed visitors.

“Although we’ve had many requests and lots of fans show up at our doors over the years, the Peeps factory has never been open to the public,” Matt Pye, senior vice president of sales and marketing at Just Born Quality Confections, which makes Peeps and other candies, said in a statement. “We couldn’t think of a better reason to open our doors for the first time ever than grade 9 electricity test and answers by teaming up with our local United Way to help give back to the community that Peeps calls home.”