How a one-off bmw m8 prototype spawned the greatest engine of a generation electricity generation by source by state

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Compared to a standard E31 8 Series, every part of the M8 prototype was designed to raise hell. Up front BMW engineers dispatched the regular 8’s familiar pop-up headlights in order to make room for grade 9 electricity questions the 6.1-liter V-12’s massive carbon-fiber intakes. The windows are made of lightweight Lexan, the body panels are composite, and the side mirrors are carbon fiber. For extra rigidity, the M8 prototype has a B-pillar, unlike the pillarless (and undeniably elegant) look on the production 8 Series. Scoops on the rear fenders, in front of the wheels, funnel air inward for additional oil cooling.

Inside the cabin there are no rear seats, because this is the type of car that gives children nightmares. The interior is all trimmed with Alcantara, the center stack is dotted with additional gauges (for oil pressure, oil temperature, and water temperature) not present on the regular 8, and the speedometer maxes out at 300 km/hr (186 mph). The chunky Kevlar race seats never would have made it to production, of course, but it speaks to the type of gearheads who built the M8 prototype—the same engineers gas under 2 dollars that built the legacy of BMW’s M division.

“Thirty years ago, real racing enthusiasts and engineers were the ones building M cars,” said director of BMW North America product and motorsport communication Thomas Plucinsky, who back then was a technical service trainer at BMW Canada. Don’t forget, when M developed the first-ever BMW M3, launched in 1985, it was a homologation special to meet production-model volume requirements for racing. The fact that it was unexpectedly successful in the marketplace was just a bonus.

Still, the S70/1 engine wasn’t all for naught. Plucinsky notes that the McLaren F1’s S70/2 engine has the same bore spacing and continuously variable VANOS for the heads (also used on the S50B30 engine in the later E36 M3). Features like the individual throttle bodies and dry-sump lubrication are also shared. Clearly, however, the McLaren’s S70/2 was a modified design to suit the packaging requirements for the mid-engine F1 rather than the front-engine 8 Series. BMW also stuck a detuned, single-cam, 24-valve, 5.6-liter version of the V-12 in the 372-hp 850CSi, which would end up as the most powerful version of the E31 8 Series.

Confusingly, the 850CSi engine is designated internally as both the S70B56 and the gas bubble retinal detachment S70/1. What gives? Nothing’s for certain, but Plucinsky suspects it was a rather creative project management strategy. “Knowing how Rosche worked,” Plucinsky told me, “the engine codes were probably confusing on purpose to hide the development costs of the M8 engine within the 850CSi project.”

Initial plans were for McLaren’s Formula 1 engine provider Honda to build a V-12 for the roadgoing F1. After Honda backed out, F1 designer Gordon Murray ran into Rosche after the 1990 German Grand Prix and the two started to iron out a plan. If Rosche hadn’t found a way to build the S70/1 in the first place, it’s unlikely the McLaren F1 could have been completed in its three-year development—at least not with BMW power behind the driver’s seat.

Compared to a standard E31 8 Series, every part of the M8 prototype was electricity edison designed to raise hell. Up front BMW engineers dispatched the regular 8’s familiar pop-up headlights in order to make room for the 6.1-liter V-12’s massive carbon-fiber intakes. The windows are made of lightweight Lexan, the body panels are composite, and the side mirrors are carbon fiber. For extra rigidity, the M8 prototype has a B-pillar, unlike the pillarless (and undeniably elegant) look on the production 8 Series static electricity definition physics. Scoops on the rear fenders, in front of the wheels, funnel air inward for additional oil cooling.

Inside the cabin there are no rear seats, because this is the type of car that gives children nightmares. The interior is all trimmed with Alcantara, the center stack is dotted with additional gauges (for oil pressure, oil temperature, and water temperature) not present on the regular 8, and the speedometer maxes out at 300 km/hr (186 mph). The chunky Kevlar race seats never would have made it to production, of course, but it speaks to the type of gearheads who built the M8 prototype—the same engineers that built the legacy of BMW’s M division.

“Thirty years ago, real racing enthusiasts and engineers were the ones building M cars,” said director of BMW North America product and motorsport communication Thomas Plucinsky, who gas and bloating after every meal back then was a technical service trainer at BMW Canada. Don’t forget, when M developed the first-ever BMW M3, launched in 1985, it was a homologation special to meet production-model volume requirements for racing. The fact that it was unexpectedly successful in the marketplace was just a bonus.

Still, the S70/1 engine wasn’t all for naught. Plucinsky notes that the McLaren F1’s S70/2 engine has the same bore spacing and continuously variable VANOS for the heads (also used on the S50B30 engine in the later E36 M3). Features like the individual throttle bodies and dry-sump lubrication are also shared. Clearly, however, the McLaren’s S70/2 was a modified design to suit the packaging requirements for the mid-engine F1 rather than the front-engine 8 Series. BMW also stuck a detuned, single-cam, 24-valve, 5.6-liter version of the V-12 in the 372-hp 850CSi, which would end up as the most electricity symbols ks2 powerful version of the E31 8 Series.

Confusingly, the 850CSi engine is designated internally as both the S70B56 and the S70/1. What gives? Nothing’s for certain, but Plucinsky suspects it was a rather creative project management strategy. “Knowing how Rosche worked,” Plucinsky told me, “the engine codes were probably confusing on purpose to hide the development costs of the M8 engine within the 850CSi project.”

Initial plans were for McLaren’s Formula 1 engine provider Honda to build a V-12 for the roadgoing F1. After Honda backed out, F1 designer Gordon Murray ran into Rosche after the 1990 German Grand Prix and the two started to iron out a plan. If Rosche hadn’t found a way to build the S70/1 in the first place, it’s unlikely the McLaren F1 could have been completed in its three-year development—at least not with BMW power behind the driver’s seat.