How can i regulate my propane oven with power out – survivalist forum static electricity how it works

The good part is that you know when you’ll be using the oven so you could connect it to a very small inverter and battery when you plan on baking. I use the same setup with my backup fridge which has a small inverter permanently installed into the case. Those UPS boxes for computers are very inefficient. For a prolonged outage you can charge the battery with a very small solar panel.

Don’t forget that most of the electrical control components in consumer devices operate from either 5vdc or 12vdc, mainly 5vdc since they use TTL chips. If you check the schematic for your ignition you might find that it uses DC voltage. In that case you could tap into the PC board and connect the battery directly to the board. If you find that the battery is drawing down your device, you can put a diode and relay in the circuit so the battery is only connected when the mains power is off. Might even be able to use the 12vdc as a trickle charger for a small battery.

I’ve done the same thing with all of my 110vac devices that I use while camping. My radio, television, CB, cameras, phones, notebook, media server all operate from 12vdc batteries. I even have a laser printer, scanner and large computer monitor that operate from 12vdc. Even built a generator that only produces 12vdc so when the power goes off if the batteries get below a preset voltage an alarm rings and I crank up the 12vdc generator which can produce up to 50 amps at 12vdc, which is enough amperage to run all of my devices and charge my batteries one at a time.

Where I live we routinely have outages that last for up to a week. My neighbors used to knock on my door and ask me why I still had power when they didn’t. When I showed them that I was using LED lights and watching a DVD on my DC television, a couple of them said that it wasn’t right that they were "suffering" when I wasn’t.

The good part is that you know when you’ll be using the oven so you could connect it to a very small inverter and battery when you plan on baking. I use the same setup with my backup fridge which has a small inverter permanently installed into the case. Those UPS boxes for computers are very inefficient. For a prolonged outage you can charge the battery with a very small solar panel.

Don’t forget that most of the electrical control components in consumer devices operate from either 5vdc or 12vdc, mainly 5vdc since they use TTL chips. If you check the schematic for your ignition you might find that it uses DC voltage. In that case you could tap into the PC board and connect the battery directly to the board. If you find that the battery is drawing down your device, you can put a diode and relay in the circuit so the battery is only connected when the mains power is off. Might even be able to use the 12vdc as a trickle charger for a small battery.

I’ve done the same thing with all of my 110vac devices that I use while camping. My radio, television, CB, cameras, phones, notebook, media server all operate from 12vdc batteries. I even have a laser printer, scanner and large computer monitor that operate from 12vdc. Even built a generator that only produces 12vdc so when the power goes off if the batteries get below a preset voltage an alarm rings and I crank up the 12vdc generator which can produce up to 50 amps at 12vdc, which is enough amperage to run all of my devices and charge my batteries one at a time.

Where I live we routinely have outages that last for up to a week. My neighbors used to knock on my door and ask me why I still had power when they didn’t. When I showed them that I was using LED lights and watching a DVD on my DC television, a couple of them said that it wasn’t right that they were "suffering" when I wasn’t.