How much does weak lungs weaken your legs – bike forums e 87 gasoline

##########

Legs burning has nothing to do with strength. It has to do with training at intensity which helps get rid of the waste products which cause the burning. My understanding is that anaerobic training lifts all limits, aerobic included. That’s mostly because it’s not really anaerobic, just a small percentage is, but for sure it’s at your aerobic limit, which is the point. power in costa rica You know you’ve gone anaerobic when no matter how hard you try to do deep diaphragm breathing, you start to pant. That’s called VT2, or the second ventilation threshold. When you do this, you’re not oxygen deprived – anaerobic processes are, by definition, anaerobic. What you have is an excess of CO2 and you’re panting to get rid of it.

IME the answer to your question is yes, but it’s more complicated than that. Your muscles would like more oxygen and they’d like to get rid of waste products faster and not only that, but to accumulate them more slowly. On that last point, lots and lots of base are helpful. electricity in the 1920s Increasing one’s ability to burn fat helps at all intensities. Burning fat makes virtually no waste products. I try to work the problem at both ends: lots of steady state at VT1 (where one just begins to breathe faster) and as much high end as my bod will allow. I start with zone 4 work, at least 45’/week and when that goes well, add VT2 (zone 5) work. I have lots of hills to practice on, but flats work too.

Building muscle tissue is fairly straightforward. if your legs are limiting you there are numerous training techniques which Will work if you do them properly and repeatedly over a span of time. Increasing lung capacity is a lot harder, it seems to me, and increasing VO2—basically gas exchange for fueling and exhaust … there is a reason the pros use EPO.

I am not a doctor nor an exercise specialist or really much of anything … but as i understand it the legs burn because (I think (carbolic acid (CO2 (cell exhaust) mixing with other compounds) becomes lactic acid and actually is burning your capillaries if you cannot extract it quickly enough. When you have reached your maximum volume of gas exchange, your cells cannot pick up waste mater and deliver fuel as fast as it is needed. The muscles starve and weaken, and the waste builds up and causes pain.

My understanding is similar to yours, with the addition that it’s really, really complicated at the molecular level. You really want to talk to a PhD in computational biology, which is a very hot field right now. So if you know any super-talented teens, head ’em in that direction. I know a little about this because I’ve been riding with a research physiologist for many years and have listened to him go on about his projects, which usually involved exercising dogs and trying to figure out what happened during that process. He loves dogs, but it’s science right, and they don’t let you cut up humans. He’s been a series research-dog adopter and is a very nice guy, really.

Anyway, it’s not lactic acid, it’s technically lactate. That knowledge won’t get you anything off a latte at Starbucks and is actually not much help, partly because it’s not the lactate that makes your legs burn, it’s some other chemical with a great long name, which I’ve forgotten. gastroparesis As you point out, going hard does increase lactate, which will eventually shut down your muscles, even if it’s not the source of the burning. Good discussion here: A question about Lactate Threshold and blood ph

One thing in the black box which we do know is that oxygen deprivation causes the kidneys to release EPO which, (if my memory is correct) will in about a month’s time result in mature red blood cells (RBCs) which transport oxygen. The way to achieve that oxygen deprivation is to absolutely turn yourself inside out on the trainer and drop your blood oxygenation below 93%. national gas average 2007 Or go to high altitude and just do jumping jacks, much more tolerable. I’ve tested this with with a blood oximeter. At sea level, I haven’t been able to drive my oxygenation below 97% because I simply don’t have the talent to burn that much oxygen in my legs. Some athletes have experimented with putting the trainer in a low oxygen chamber, which works, but because it’s low oxygen, their effort is also lower and results of these experiments were inconclusive. Or simply train low, sleep high. Use your helicopter.

Other than the EPO thing, and as I think has been mentioned, the first thing that happens during hard training is that plasma volume increases. This is pretty quick, a couple weeks maybe. The next thing is that heart ejection fraction increases. This is a lot slower and keeps getting better for a long time, years. o gastroenterologista cuida do que This is one of the reasons that resting HR drops in hard-working endurance athletes. I have a buddy who has on his Rider ID: "My resting HR is 40," just in case some EMT gets all worried about it. When I’m training hard, mine will be about 45 when well rested and 50-52 when recovering. That’s pretty normal. Some elites will be down in the 30s.

Yup. Look at all the older pro racers. That "flabby gut"? They learned years ago to relax those abdominal muscles so they could pull that diaphram down. Another trick – exhale. This from a swim coach. She stressed it matter little how much we inhaled and everything how much we exhaled. Reason? It is by exhaling very deeply that we clear the old air from the lowest portion of our lungs – where the lung’s best oxygen receptors hand out. With a partial inhale, what we didn’t expel is left nullifying those super oxygen receptors. gas utility boston Her words were that if we exhaled everything (easy in freestyle; you have a long stretch with your face underwater) and only get a 1/4 breath because a wave just slapped our face, we would be way ahead of the guy doing less than complete exhales.

And to the OP’s question – yes, with inadequate oxygen your legs will hurt more. Lack of oxygen, either through huge muscle demands or lack of supply, hurts, both upstairs (lungs, etc, and in your legs. You can ride a higher gear. This wil lower your oxygen demand as you will be in anaerobic mode, ie a metabolism that doesn’t use blood oxygen. Helps with this issue, but has its own limitations.

Yup. gas x ultra strength during pregnancy Look at all the older pro racers. That "flabby gut"? They learned years ago to relax those abdominal muscles so they could pull that diaphram down. Another trick – exhale. This from a swim coach. She stressed it matter little how much we inhaled and everything how much we exhaled. Reason? It is by exhaling very deeply that we clear the old air from the lowest portion of our lungs – where the lung’s best oxygen receptors hand out. With a partial inhale, what we didn’t expel is left nullifying those super oxygen receptors. Her words were that if we exhaled everything (easy in freestyle; you have a long stretch with your face underwater) and only get a 1/4 breath because a wave just slapped our face, we would be way ahead of the guy doing less than complete exhales.

And to the OP’s question – yes, with inadequate oxygen your legs will hurt more. Lack of oxygen, either through huge muscle demands or lack of supply, hurts, both upstairs (lungs, etc, and in your legs. You can ride a higher gear. This wil lower your oxygen demand as you will be in anaerobic mode, ie a metabolism that doesn’t use blood oxygen. 5 gases emitted from the exhaust pipe Helps with this issue, but has its own limitations.

While I agree that as complete an exhalation as possible maximizes breathing efficiency, as it minimizes the amount of residual "stale" air in the lungs and replaces it with fresh, fully oxygenated air, there are no "oxygen receptors" in the lungs, super or otherwise – gases diffuse in and out of the lungs through the thin fluid layer that coats the alveoli (the "air sacs") – it’s a purely physical process, the rate and direction of which depend on (i) the gas concentration gradient between the blood in the vessels surrounding the alveoli and the air in the alveoli, and (ii) the area available for gas exchange. The reason an essentially passive process like gas diffusion can provide the body with sufficient oxygen to support activity comes down to the enormous gas exchange area in the lungs – which in the average set of lungs is about half the area of a tennis court.

Breathing while swimming is an interesting issue, synching inhalation/exhalation with the stroke notwithstanding. I was talking with a accomplished triathlete a while back, getting her opinion on why good swimming is essential to successful triathlon competition (my daughter is a competitive swimmer, and while she runs like a tree and can hardly stay upright on a bike, she kicks even seasoned triathletes’ arses in the water), and she told me that, while most people can develop into decent runners and cyclists, learning to swim effectively takes much longer, as the swimmers have to physically adapt to the slight but real compression on the chest and lungs from water pressure, and this can take years. Coaches looking for promising triathletes look for swimmers first, knowing that the other disciplines can be taught