How nebraska’s largest publicly traded companies fared in 2017 money omaha.com hp gas online registration

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It is Nebraska’s largest trucking company, one of the biggest in the country, and shares soared 45 percent in 2017. The Omaha-based operator of about 7,000 trucks through nine months of 2017 raised revenue and net income after a disappointing 2016, when revenue fell 4 percent and profit plunged 36 percent. The investor optimism in 2017 was based on better trends in freight transportation. The widely followed industry benchmark the Cass Freight Index rose for the 12 consecutive months ended in November, when it climbed 6.3 percent. All of that means more demand for freight transportation, with much of the nation’s roster of consumer staples traveling via truck. Also, as noted by Bloomberg Intelligence, an arm of Bloomberg News, rebuilding efforts related to the Gulf Coast hurricanes of this year boosted freight transportation demand. The company said in a statement it spent almost $1 billion in 2017 on trucks, equipment and driver perks. “We are extremely proud of all our associates and professional drivers that made 2017 a success,” the company said.

Both Omaha-based ag equipment makers fell just short of beating the S&P 500, rising about 19 percent apiece. Both make irrigation gear that makes farmland more productive and are considered long-term beneficiaries of a worldwide food demand expected to rise by almost three-quarters in the next 30 years. Lindsay said in its fiscal 2017 earnings report this month that farm income is expected to rise modestly this year in the United States, which is always good news for equipment dealers. But this month, analysts at wealth adviser Stifel warned investors of “lower growth outlook for the irrigation segment” based on dealers who were surveyed and said they are anticipating slower sales than previously forecast. Both companies also make fabricated metal products such as utility poles, and those lines of business can help when ag hits a snag. “In spite of going through the fourth year of a cyclical downturn in the agricultural industry, financial results reflected increased revenues and earnings due to solid performance in the infrastructure segment,” Lindsay Chief Financial Officer Brian Ketcham told The World-Herald.

The Omaha-based online brokerage is one of the industry’s largest by daily trades, serving both individual investors and a growing cadre of Main Street financial advisers who farm out their trading and portfolio management to the company. Those are the brokers and wealth planners controlling billions on retirement accounts, investment funds and family trusts. It all worked like a money machine in 2017, with shares rising 18 percent. Of key interest to industry watchers was TD Ameritrade’s asset gathering, or how many new customer dollars were deposited or taken under management from registered advisers who are affiliated with the company. It is a key metric, because when those customers trade stocks or bonds, TD Ameritrade collects a commission. It also earns income from interest-bearing accounts connected to customer deposits. For the fiscal year 2017 ended in September, the total new asset gathering amounted to $80 billion, a 10 percent growth rate. The company says there is more to come: TD Ameritrade said a survey it conducted this year indicates that more than half of established brokers in the United States are dissatisfied with their current setup and plan within three years to become independent advisers — the kind that need a company like TD Ameritrade to do the trading and portfolio management of client assets. “We remain committed to increasing our investment in cutting-edge technology, as well as employee development, particularly in Omaha. With a strengthened competitive position and increased scale, we expect this strong momentum to continue and look forward to 2018,” TD Ameritrade said in a statement to The World-Herald.

It is Nebraska’s largest trucking company, one of the biggest in the country, and shares soared 45 percent in 2017. The Omaha-based operator of about 7,000 trucks through nine months of 2017 raised revenue and net income after a disappointing 2016, when revenue fell 4 percent and profit plunged 36 percent. The investor optimism in 2017 was based on better trends in freight transportation. The widely followed industry benchmark the Cass Freight Index rose for the 12 consecutive months ended in November, when it climbed 6.3 percent. All of that means more demand for freight transportation, with much of the nation’s roster of consumer staples traveling via truck. Also, as noted by Bloomberg Intelligence, an arm of Bloomberg News, rebuilding efforts related to the Gulf Coast hurricanes of this year boosted freight transportation demand. The company said in a statement it spent almost $1 billion in 2017 on trucks, equipment and driver perks. “We are extremely proud of all our associates and professional drivers that made 2017 a success,” the company said.

Both Omaha-based ag equipment makers fell just short of beating the S&P 500, rising about 19 percent apiece. Both make irrigation gear that makes farmland more productive and are considered long-term beneficiaries of a worldwide food demand expected to rise by almost three-quarters in the next 30 years. Lindsay said in its fiscal 2017 earnings report this month that farm income is expected to rise modestly this year in the United States, which is always good news for equipment dealers. But this month, analysts at wealth adviser Stifel warned investors of “lower growth outlook for the irrigation segment” based on dealers who were surveyed and said they are anticipating slower sales than previously forecast. Both companies also make fabricated metal products such as utility poles, and those lines of business can help when ag hits a snag. “In spite of going through the fourth year of a cyclical downturn in the agricultural industry, financial results reflected increased revenues and earnings due to solid performance in the infrastructure segment,” Lindsay Chief Financial Officer Brian Ketcham told The World-Herald.

The Omaha-based online brokerage is one of the industry’s largest by daily trades, serving both individual investors and a growing cadre of Main Street financial advisers who farm out their trading and portfolio management to the company. Those are the brokers and wealth planners controlling billions on retirement accounts, investment funds and family trusts. It all worked like a money machine in 2017, with shares rising 18 percent. Of key interest to industry watchers was TD Ameritrade’s asset gathering, or how many new customer dollars were deposited or taken under management from registered advisers who are affiliated with the company. It is a key metric, because when those customers trade stocks or bonds, TD Ameritrade collects a commission. It also earns income from interest-bearing accounts connected to customer deposits. For the fiscal year 2017 ended in September, the total new asset gathering amounted to $80 billion, a 10 percent growth rate. The company says there is more to come: TD Ameritrade said a survey it conducted this year indicates that more than half of established brokers in the United States are dissatisfied with their current setup and plan within three years to become independent advisers — the kind that need a company like TD Ameritrade to do the trading and portfolio management of client assets. “We remain committed to increasing our investment in cutting-edge technology, as well as employee development, particularly in Omaha. With a strengthened competitive position and increased scale, we expect this strong momentum to continue and look forward to 2018,” TD Ameritrade said in a statement to The World-Herald.