How silent fall the cherry blossoms page 50 alternate history discussion electricity deregulation map

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Click to expand…It’s still not clear to me if the missiles delivering Sarin will be used against a city like London, or to accompany the upcoming Ardennes offensive. Also, V1s are primitive cruise missiles. They can fly a straight line over allied positions in bad visibility. Could it be feasible to launch gobs of them them so they travel at low altitudes and, instead of releasing the gas from an explosive warhead on impact, have the warhead triggered to release the gas in a broadcast manner over a wide area behind allied lines, affecting troop concentrations. The V-2s, which would probably have their payload dispersed in an explosive warhead, might just as well be aimed at Antwerp or other city impotant to allied logistics. Putting on my Adolf Hitler mustache, I would imagine that (combined with the various German and Japanese chemical, biological, and possibly nuclear attacks on the US), a viciously successful military offensive that eliminates or cuts off a large segment of the allied armies threatening the Reich from the west, might have more effect than just killing several thousand more Londoners with nerve gas.

It’s still not clear to me if the missiles delivering Sarin will be used against a city like London, or to accompany the upcoming Ardennes offensive. Also, V1s are primitive cruise missiles. They can fly a straight line over allied positions in bad visibility. Could it be feasible to launch gobs of them them so they travel at low altitudes and, instead of releasing the gas from an explosive warhead on impact, have the warhead triggered to release the gas in a broadcast manner over a wide area behind allied lines, affecting troop concentrations. The V-2s, which would probably have their payload dispersed in an explosive warhead, might just as well be aimed at Antwerp or other city impotant to allied logistics. Putting on my Adolf Hitler mustache, I would imagine that (combined with the various German and Japanese chemical, biological, and possibly nuclear attacks on the US), a viciously successful military offensive that eliminates or cuts off a large segment of the allied armies threatening the Reich from the west, might have more effect than just killing several thousand more Londoners with nerve gas.

At 10 a.m. precisely the Prime Minister of Great Britain, Winston Churchill entered the Oval Office to greet his friend and ally President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. After several minutes of informal talk and two of President Roosevelt’s legendary martinis the two got down to the reason for Churchill’s visit.

Churchill pulled out a satchel from which he took a manila envelope, opening said envelope he produced the letter now looking somewhat more the worse for wear that had turned things upside down for the Allies. “It’s genuine,” he said. “Every analyst whose looked at it and seen the handwriting concurs that the writing is definitely that of Hirohito and the paper and inks are consistent with those used in the Imperial Palace. If it’s a forgery it’s a bloody brilliant one.”

FDR took a long draw on his cigarette and asked Churchill, “In that case Winston the question becomes now, what do we do about it?” “There’s no question this is a golden opportunity Franklin,” Churchill said as he lit one of his famous cigars. “I agree,” FDR replied, “The question is how we exploit it?”

“Hirohito clearly wants us to do his dirty work for him,” stated Churchill. “He wants us to kill off his war cabinet thus allowing him to form a new cabinet more amenable to surrender to the West.” FDR nodded. “The dates, times, and places for the cabinet’s meetings are included in Hirohito’s information. I’ve already talked with officers in the USAAF and they’ve assured me that if we so order it they could make it so not so much as a mouse got out of the area alive.” Churchill snorted briefly and said, “I was hoping we would be able to bring some of those individuals up on charges of war crimes. Death quickly and cleanly by being blown to pieces seems far cleaner and easier then watching them sweat and swing at the end of a noose as some of them so richly deserve.” “Perhaps,” Roosevelt replied smiling. “But at the same time if this allows us a chance for peace in the Pacific earlier can we afford to not pass it up?” “I think we both know the answer to that my friend,” said Churchill. “There is however one big mustachioed fly in the ointment however.” “Stalin,” both men said together and laughed.

“Concluding peace early with Japan will make Stalin absolutely furious,” Churchill observed. “He has been hoping to add part of Manchuria and all of Korea to his holdings or at least to take them and set up puppet states loyal to him. Now, he’s going to have to settle for whatever he can get in Europe. That’s going to make him even more difficult to deal with at the bargaining table.” Roosevelt smiled that crafty Roosevelt smile that Winston Churchill had come to know so well. “All right Franklin,” Churchill said as if the President of the United States were a naughty schoolboy caught in the act. “You obviously have something in mind regarding our Russian friend. Don’t keep me in suspense what is it?”

President Roosevelt leaned forward and said, “First Winston, let me have you speak with General Bill Donovan. He has a plan in mind regarding some of the other information that the Emperor thoughtfully provided to us in that briefcase. Once you hear his plans I think you’ll understand how he got his name ‘Wild Bill!’”

At 6 a.m. two submarines the U-2504 and the U-2511 pulled out of their berths at Wilhelmshaven. There was no one to see either of them pull out. Indeed the immediate area had been cleared of all non-essential personnel and the SS was conducting sweeps of the surrounding area keeping on the lookout for anyone looking unusually interested in the departures.

Aboard the U-2504, Otto Skorzeny watched the sub pull away from the dock and head out into the harbor. Skorzeny felt a sense of sadness for he knew this would be the last view he would have of the Fatherland. Some of his team was with him on the bridge and a few of them had tears in their eyes as they watched the departure. All of them loved the Fatherland and were willing to pay the ultimate price for it. They would soon be doing just that.

The SS officer looked at the U-2511 which was riding low in the water beside its sister sub. She had been loaded in ruthless secrecy the night before. Her cargo had been brought in on unmarked trucks then when it was at dockside the SS had quickly cleared the area of all but the sub crew needed for the loading and the technicians who were with the trucks. The loading took one hour. The U-2511 was now loaded down with the cargo which was vital for this phase of Kommandounternehmen Trojanischer Sieg (Trojan Victory). The two subs would travel in tandem to the rendezvous point which if all went well would be six days from now, after the Arctic Dream had cleared the Orkney monitoring point.

At the same time that the two subs were sailing for their rendezvous, the target of that rendezvous was also departing Stockholm. The Arctic Dream laden with gourmet foods now very difficult to procure in a rationing United States pulled out of its berth and headed into the Baltic Sea. Aboard Walter Eisner watched the ship pull away from the dock. His identity papers indicated he was Oscar Roland, assistant radio technician on the ship. He and one other in the engine room were both readying themselves for their part of the mission.

For the next six days, Eisner and his cohort would perform the duties assigned them. Their part in this would come after they had cleared the neutrality station at Orkney. The main danger until then was having their papers checked. Everything had been done to ensure the papers were a perfect forgery but all it would take would be one mistake and this part of Trojan Victory would be ended.