How to become a registered nurse in the military gas and electric phone number

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Although still reliant on doctors and other primary care providers to order prescriptions and certain treatments, registered nurses have become collaborative professionals rather than subordinates, with an arsenal of independent actions to help repair, maintain, and promote patients’ health.

Specifically, a registered nurse is distinguished from others, such as licensed practical nurses and certified nursing assistants, by education level, treatment privileges, and independence. Only a registered nurse may assess and treat wounds, review diagnostic tests, and give medications ordered by a physician.

On the other hand, some nurses who pursue advanced nursing practice degrees earn even greater autonomy. Nurse Practitioners, for example, are able to practice much the same way as doctors: they may run a practice, form medical diagnoses, and prescribe medications. How Civilians Become RNs

State nursing boards specify educational and licensing requirements, but in general, RNs must graduate from a board-approved associate or bachelor’s degree program before sitting for the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN).

All military RNs are commissioned officers, so, unfortunately, RNs with an associate degree are disqualified. Any civilian who’s earned a bachelor’s degree in nursing and received an RN license in their state can apply for a direct commission. RNs, doctors, lawyers, and other licensed professionals in this pipeline receive a somewhat abridged version of officer candidate training to orient them to the military culture and their role in it as officers.

There are also programs that help civilians offset the cost of nursing education in exchange for serving once they graduate. The Navy, for example, offers a full tuition ride (unless you can find a school that charges over $180,000) to high school students going into a nursing program, or up to $34,000 to current student nurses through their Nurse Candidate Program. The Air Force also has a scholarship program for health professionals and each branch may offer college loan repayment incentives.

Scholarship programs are generally only for civilians aiming for a military career as RNs, but what about those already serving in the military? As with other college degrees, those who serve can receive tuition assistance or use their GI Bill benefits to pay for off-duty courses in an accredited nursing program.

Completing a bachelor degree while serving as a full-time enlistee is no breeze, but depending on your level of experience in an enlisted healthcare specialty and the number of credits your college is willing to grant for military experience, you may be able to make your journey that much easier. Education in the Army and Navy

The American Council on Education (ACE) recommends college credits for experience and training in the military (except the Air Force, for some reason.) With a transcript issued by your branch of service, you may be able to knock out some of the common prerequisites for a nursing program, such as general education requirements and anatomy/physiology.

• Navy Corpsmen who’ve reached at least E-4 may be eligible for three semester hours of nursing fundamentals, physical assessment, and health information management. Higher ratings get even more recommended credits, such as pharmacology and medical-surgical nursing.

Airmen enlisted in the Physical Medicine or Aerospace Medical fields may be eligible for credits for their training and experience awarded by the Community College of the Air Force (CCAF). By combining that with resident and distance-learning courses, airmen can earn an associate degree in the CCAF Allied Health Sciences Program.​

While not a nursing-specific degree, this may help fulfill some of the requirements to earn a BS in nursing, since it includes a variety of liberal arts credits and electives in biology, chemistry, psychology, and pharmacology. Certifications

According to Navy’s Credentialing Opportunities On-Line (COOL), Corpsmen may be eligible to receive Navy funding to pay for the NCLEX-RN exam. Remember, though, that to receive an RN license through this exam, you’ll still need to earn your bachelor’s degree in nursing through appropriate off-duty education.

While pursuing a nursing education, it obviously couldn’t hurt to get licenses in some of these specialties -– Emergency Medical Technician, Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse, or Certified Nurse Technician -– which can provide you with additional experience, earning power, and a vocational safety net should you choose to leave the service and complete your nursing education as a civilian.