How to create your first digitalocean droplet digitalocean no electricity jokes

The most popular defaults are pre-selected, so you can scroll straight to the end and click Create Droplet without changing a thing. In this case, you can skip to Step 10 of this tutorial to log into your Droplet. Alternatively, if you want to customize your Droplet or learn more about the options on the Create Droplet page, continue reading with Step 2. Step 2 — Choosing an Image

• Distributions are images with no additional software, including Ubuntu, Fedora, Debian, and CentOS as well as FreeBSD. At the time of this writing, the 64-bit Ubuntu 16.04 image is selected by default. To change to a different version or architecture click the down arrow and make a selection from the list.

• Standard Droplets: Balanced virtual machines with a healthy amount of memory tuned to host and scale applications like blogs, web applications, testing / staging environments, in-memory caching and databases. Standard plans begin with 1 GB of RAM, 1 CPU, 25 GB of SSD Disk, and 1 TB of data transfer for $5/month and run all the way to 192 GB of RAM, 24 CPUs, 3.75 TB of SSD and 12 TB of data transfer.

• Optimized Droplets: These compute-optimized virtual machines with dedicated hyper-threads from best-in-class Intel CPUs are ideal for CPU Intensive applications like CI/CD, video encoding, machine learning, ad serving, batch processing and active front-end web servers.

* Note: If your cloud server will have less than 3 GB of RAM, and especially if it has less than 1 GB of RAM, we recommend using a 32-bit operating system. This is because processes can require significantly more memory on a 64-bit architecture and on servers with a limited amount of RAM, any performance benefits that might be gained from a 64-bit architecture would be offset by having less memory available for buffers and caching.

When you enable backups, a snapshot of the live system is automatically taken each week, creating a crash-consistent, point-in-time image. These images can be used to restore the existing Droplet or create a new one. Weekly backups add about 20% of the monthly price of the Droplet to the total cost. The specific cost is displayed when you click Enable Backups.

DigitalOcean Block Storage allows you to create and attach additional storage volumes to your Droplets. At the time of this writing, Block Storage is available in the FRA1, NYC1, SFO2, SPG1, and TOR1 datacenter regions. Additional regions will be added over time.

Volumes are independent resources that can be moved from one Droplet to another within the same datacenter. Attached volumes function like locally connected storage drives, allowing you to manage your storage with familiar tools and techniques. To learn more about them, visit How To Use Block Storage on DigitalOcean.

Private Networking enables an additional networking interface that can only be accessed by other Droplets within the same datacenter. This can be helpful to keep traffic between Droplets from being routed outside the datacenter over the public internet. Private networking is provided at no extra cost.

Once you upload a key, it is available in your account. Now and in the future, you can check the box by the key name to add it to Droplets. Visit How To Use SSH Keys with DigitalOcean Droplets for detailed directions on how to create and use SSH keys.

Each Droplet must have a name. These names are used in the DigitalOcean Control Panel and as the server’s hostname. A default name is provided based on the options you selected, but you can modify the name(s) to suit your needs. For example, you may want to use a Fully Qualified Domain Name, or FQDN (e.g. droplet1.example.com).

If you’re using SSH keys, you will be logged into the server immediately. If you aren’t using SSH keys, you’ll be prompted for a password. Enter the root password that was emailed to you when you created the server, then press ENTER. Note that the password will not be visible on the screen as you type for security reasons.

If you’re using SSH keys, you will be logged into the server immediately. If you aren’t using SSH keys, you’ll be prompted for a password. Enter the root password that was emailed to you when you created your server, then press ENTER. Note that the password will not be visible on the screen as you type for security reasons.