Hurricane season starts june 1 tips for travel to hurricane areas gas after eating red meat

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Some affected areas are still recovering even as the start of the 2018 hurricane season for the Atlantic Ocean, the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico approaches. Almost eight months after Hurricane Maria pummeled Puerto Rico, tens of thousands of residents are still without electricity. Hurricane season runs from June 1 to Nov. 30.

Researchers at Colorado State University are predicting a slightly above-average Atlantic hurricane season for this year: 14 named storms, including seven hurricanes. Three of those are expected to reach major hurricane strength with winds of 111 miles per hour or greater. An average hurricane season will result in 12 storms, six of them hurricanes, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) says.

“If you think back last few years, I can’t think of a year when we didn’t have a significant storm,” says Stan Sandberg, co-founder of TravelInsurance.com, a comparison site for travel insurance plans. “It seems that it’s becoming more of an annual risk.”

According to NOAA data, the U.S. locations with the highest chances of being struck by a tropical storm or hurricane are: Miami (48 percent chance), Cape Hatteras, N.C. (48 percent), San Juan, Puerto Rico (42 percent), and New Orleans (40 percent). The U.S. coastline tends to get hit later in the season when the water is warmer.

The Caribbean Hurricane Network looked at the number of hurricanes experienced between 1851 to 2010. Abaco, an island in the Bahamas, had 18 hurricanes from Categories 3 to 5 in that time, the most of any Caribbean island. Grand Bahama, also in the Bahamas, had 15 and Saba, an island in the Lesser Antilles chain that is a municipality of the Netherlands, also had 15 high-category hurricanes.

Other plans provide emergency travel assistance such as medical services and emergency medication transportation. The benefits could also include help with missed connections, lost baggage, lost travel documents, prescription replacement, and emergency cash, the company says.

“It may not be a best balance of cost-effectiveness and benefits,” he says. “You don’t have the ability to understand, ‘Is this the best policy I’m going to get for my particular trip?’ You may be able to come up with a generally more cost-effective plan.”

While cell phone service may not work well during a natural disaster, it’s still important to have devices ready in case they do become the best mode of communication, says Nicki Palmer, chief network engineer and head of wireless networks at Verizon.

“Charge your devices before a storm hits, including smartphones, laptops, tablets, DVD players, flashlights and radios,” she says. “To preserve battery life, dim the background light on your screen and turn off background data applications or Wi-Fi search services.”

Other phone advice: program It to receive emergency alerts, download weather applications and alerts, subscribe to alerts from aid and relief organizations such as the Red Cross and the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and back it all up.

Other plans provide emergency travel assistance such as medical services and emergency medication transportation. The benefits could also include help with missed connections, lost baggage, lost travel documents, prescription replacement, and emergency cash, the company says.

“It may not be a best balance of cost-effectiveness and benefits,” he says. “You don’t have the ability to understand, ‘Is this the best policy I’m going to get for my particular trip? You may be able to come up with a generally more cost-effective plan.”

While cell phone service may not work well during a natural disaster, it’s still important to have devices ready in case they do become the best mode of communication, says Nicki Palmer, chief network engineer and head of wireless networks at Verizon.

“Charge your devices before a storm hits, including smartphones, laptops, tablets, DVD players, flashlights and radios,” she says. “To preserve battery life, dim the background light on your screen and turn off background data applications or Wi-Fi search services.”

Other phone advice: program It to receive emergency alerts, download weather applications and alerts, subscribe to alerts from aid and relief organizations such as the Red Cross and the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and back it all up.