Ilx premium or regular gas – acurazine – acura enthusiast community gasbuddy touch

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It looks like the 2.0 ILX has the R20A1 engine. I don’t know anything about it, but Wiki says it has a 10.5:1 compression ratio. Compression ratio isn’t always the end all say all when it comes to what kind of fuel is required, but a 10.5:1 isn’t terribly high. I’d bet you could get away with regular or mid grade. But I’m with the others. I’d go with whatever Acura recommended.

I don’t believe auto manufacturers always have your best interest in mind. But when it comes to fuel octane, I fail to believe that there’s some sort of conspiracy between automakers and oil companies where a higher octane would be recommended when it’s not needed. In fact, a car requiring higher octane fuel is usually seen as a negative attribute when purchasing a car. If they could engineer the motor to have the same power and performance with regular fuel, they’d do it since it would be a good feature to tout. That’s the case with a lot of these direct injection turbocharged vehicles. It’s considered a feature to sell a higher horsepower, efficient and turbocharged vehicle that only needs regular. Unfortunately, with standard port injection – most engines with compression ratios over 11:1 are going to need premium or they’ll experience reduced performance and economy.

It looks like the 2.0 ILX has the R20A1 engine. I don’t know anything about it, but Wiki says it has a 10.5:1 compression ratio. Compression ratio isn’t always the end all say all when it comes to what kind of fuel is required, but a 10.5:1 isn’t terribly high. I’d bet you could get away with regular or mid grade. But I’m with the others. I’d go with whatever Acura recommended.

I don’t believe auto manufacturers always have your best interest in mind. But when it comes to fuel octane, I fail to believe that there’s some sort of conspiracy between automakers and oil companies where a higher octane would be recommended when it’s not needed. In fact, a car requiring higher octane fuel is usually seen as a negative attribute when purchasing a car. If they could engineer the motor to have the same power and performance with regular fuel, they’d do it since it would be a good feature to tout. That’s the case with a lot of these direct injection turbocharged vehicles. It’s considered a feature to sell a higher horsepower, efficient and turbocharged vehicle that only needs regular. Unfortunately, with standard port injection – most engines with compression ratios over 11:1 are going to need premium or they’ll experience reduced performance and economy.Then there are engines like the SkyActivG 2.5 in my wife’s 2016 Mazda3 s GT; it is normally aspirated, has a compression ratio of something like 13.0:1, and runs on Regular 87 AKI fuel.

I can give my experience with my 2013 2.4L. I started off using premium (91 octane in a higher-elevation area). Then after a few years I switched to regular (having moved, now 87 octane in a low-elevation area). I noticed a drop in fuel economy, but the drop in price was even bigger (2-3 MPG drop, but 50-60c/gal drop) so I was saving money. I think I noticed a slight performance drop, but it’s hard to be certain.

However, as time went on, my car kept running worse and worse. The engine was louder and less smooth. After a year of that I switched back to premium (now 93 octane in the same low-elevation area) and the car is back to running smoothly and quieter (although, it’s obviously not a quiet car in general). It’s like brand new, again. So, for me, I like premium, even with the higher price tag. As I’m now down to about 4-5k miles driven per year, it doesn’t make that big of a difference cost-wise, but gives me a better driving experience and considerable more confidence in my car’s longevity–if the engine is gasping and straining some at regular octane levels, how much stress is that putting on things?