Improve your chess. top 10 things to avoid! gas in back relief

Many chess fans have gone years without making any significant improvement, even after studying many chess books, courses or hiring personal chess teachers. Many players get stuck below or around the 2100 rating and, little by little, their initial joy for the game diminishes.

IMPORTANT: You cannot improve at chess by any means. No-one improved at chess by just watching 2-hour videos or by buying courses or books like "ultimate…", "how to beat…", "secrets…", "grandmaster over-night", "quick…" and so on. NO, chess improvement means high-quality chess lessons, professional written courses, individual work, positional training …and a bit of talent. Improve at chess – 10 "secret" obstacles

Playing chess – practice – is very important for improvement. When you play chess (over the board, at tournaments), you put into practice what you have learned, you use your brain to think chess, you are in the testing environment, you test your accumulated knowledge and skill against another person.

However, too much play and too little study holds you back. You can repeat the same mistakes over and over. You will tend to follow your own old patterns and not have time to develop a different, correct thinking process, and to learn proper strategy and new ideas.

There is no shortcut; a necessary task for serious improvement is to have COMPLETE knowledge of chess theory, of chess strategy. Then, you will know what TO DO in any situation on the chess board. It makes no sense to re-invent the wheel when there are full blueprints available.

Let’s say you have two different lessons about the isolated pawn. The first lesson tells you that the isolated pawn is weak in the endgame and then fills the space with "illustrative" games. The second lesson systematizes the possible endgames into 10 possible types, tells you exactly which is a draw and which is winning, tells you how to defend and how to attack for each case, tells you exactly what to do in every situation.

Obviously the difference is enormous; the first lesson leaves you in semi-obscurity and you are left with the impression that the endgames are lost for the side with the isolated pawn, which is far from true. The second lesson really and concretely teaches you that subject so you will know what you have to do in every situation and what endgames to aim for, so that you can get the maximum from the position, win or draw.

What is Active Learning? When you study a chess lesson, you have to WORK on it, you have to ask yourself questions all the time; when you study an annotated game, you should stop at almost every move to try to understand them or even find better moves. You should also try to guess the moves before looking at them.

Positional exercises may be chosen from any stage of the game, but are most often from the middlegame. They are usually normal positions, where there is no tactical blow, trick, or anything to make you say "wow". This is “normal” chess, the 95% of the game where we employ strategy. That is, we use logical thinking, create plans, stop opponent’s plans, re-arrange our pieces, provoke weaknesses, prepare an attack, defend etc…etc… – this is chess strategy.

This is what we do in our core chess courses, Grandmaster Package, which is structured as 50% theory and 50% positional exercises. In the last 4 months of the course, we give a wide range of instructive, well-selected positions. Then we offer extensive analysis of the position and explain how the solution could be found.

It is indeed convenient to use the computer, you do not have to re-arrange the pieces all the time and it is …modern. But when you prepare for chess, the technology, colors, design and so on do not help that much. They may even harm your progress.

Using chess software, chess engines, watching videos, could have benefits if it is done moderately, but all these bring little progress. Even at our online chess school, we offer all the lessons in PDF format so that they can be conveniently printed out and studied at the board.

A player who wants to improve should concentrate only on understanding chess better and more deeply. At those moments when he wants to study a good lesson or an instructive game, to solve different positions, to understand strategic subtleties and to find excellent moves …at THAT moment there is progress… and the rating will surely increase sooner or later.

You have to think positively. Look at the beauty of this game, at the pleasure such a nice hobby brings, to the fact that it develops our thinking. Appreciate that we have a great intellectual game that helps our brain, and is a nice social game, a game where we use our ideas against other humans’ ideas. And do not forget: the more you understand it, the more enjoyable it is.