Inside the antique mall that’s greg pence’s largest asset gas and supply locations

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Along with another smaller antique mall in nearby Bloomington, this 72,000-square-foot mall is Pence’s largest asset. The warehouse-like building carries everything from a $10 U.S. Capitol porcelain plate to an $800 barbecue bull that lets smoke out of its nose, with plenty of Elvis figurines, costume jewelry, knives and grandfather clocks stuffed in between.

One scene in a recent minute-long campaign video was shot in the mall; it’s a nod to the small businessman and job creator bona fides he touts in fundraising emails. Employees said Pence stops in three or four times a week when he’s in town.

But on a crisp, sunny Friday — one of those Indiana spring days that gave way to snow and rain showers three hours later — Pence wasn’t seen at the antique mall. Store manager Joyce Bishop said the campaign had told her to expect this reporter.

The value of the two antique malls, organized as Pence Group LLC, is somewhere between $5 million and $25 million, according to Pence’s financial disclosure form, filed with the Clerk of the House in January. (Lawmakers and candidates are required to report the value of their assets only in broad ranges.) The Exit 76 mall has 15 employees, while the smaller one in Bloomington has 12.

Pence raised $424,000 in the first quarter of this year and is benefiting from outside spending from groups allied with the Trump administration, such as 45Committee and Great America PAC. That’s frustrated some Republican consultants whose clients need the help more.

Republican primary opponent Jonathan Lamb has loaned his campaign $800,000 since launching his candidacy, but raised just $9,000 during the first quarter. His biggest expense so far has been media consulting for ads in which he pokes fun at his last name and cracks an egg into a frying pan.

If Pence wins the nomination on May 8, he’s almost certainly going to be the next representative from this district, which backed President Donald Trump by 40 points in 2016. Incumbent Rep. Luke Messer is running for the GOP Senate nod, and is a close ally of Pence, who served as Messer’s finance chairman before launching his own campaign.

“Everybody thinks, ‘Oh, he’s not going to be involved,’” Bishop said when asked if Pence’s new pastime as a candidate takes him away from the mall. “He knows exactly what’s going on here,” she said, adding that she’s in communication with him every day.

“To the dealers, it’s a great model,” said another vendor named Susan, who was restocking her booth. “They collect sales tax for me, they do all the insurance, they do all the utilities, they deal with customers … I don’t have to worry about anything except bringing new merchandise.”

“And I hope you noticed, we’re really clean. That is one of Gregory’s pet peeves,” she added. A shopper looks over the merchandise at the Pence’s Exit 76 Antique Mall in Edinburgh, Ind., on April 6. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call) The eldest Pence

The oldest of six siblings, Pence served four years in the Marine Corps, experience that’s featured prominently in his ads. This is his first run for office, but he was often at his brother’s side during his campaigns — so much so that he’d sometimes be mistaken for the vice president.

Pence had previously worked for Marathon Oil and Unocal Corporation, then became vice president of Kiel Brothers Oil Company, the family’s gas station and convenience store business. In 2004, the company filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy and Greg resigned.

Along with another smaller antique mall in nearby Bloomington, this 72,000-square-foot mall is Pence’s largest asset. The warehouse-like building carries everything from a $10 U.S. Capitol porcelain plate to an $800 barbecue bull that lets smoke out of its nose, with plenty of Elvis figurines, costume jewelry, knives and grandfather clocks stuffed in between.

One scene in a recent minute-long campaign video was shot in the mall; it’s a nod to the small businessman and job creator bona fides he touts in fundraising emails. Employees said Pence stops in three or four times a week when he’s in town.

But on a crisp, sunny Friday — one of those Indiana spring days that gave way to snow and rain showers three hours later — Pence wasn’t seen at the antique mall. Store manager Joyce Bishop said the campaign had told her to expect this reporter.

The value of the two antique malls, organized as Pence Group LLC, is somewhere between $5 million and $25 million, according to Pence’s financial disclosure form, filed with the Clerk of the House in January. (Lawmakers and candidates are required to report the value of their assets only in broad ranges.) The Exit 76 mall has 15 employees, while the smaller one in Bloomington has 12.

Pence raised $424,000 in the first quarter of this year and is benefiting from outside spending from groups allied with the Trump administration, such as 45Committee and Great America PAC. That’s frustrated some Republican consultants whose clients need the help more.

Republican primary opponent Jonathan Lamb has loaned his campaign $800,000 since launching his candidacy, but raised just $9,000 during the first quarter. His biggest expense so far has been media consulting for ads in which he pokes fun at his last name and cracks an egg into a frying pan.

If Pence wins the nomination on May 8, he’s almost certainly going to be the next representative from this district, which backed President Donald Trump by 40 points in 2016. Incumbent Rep. Luke Messer is running for the GOP Senate nod, and is a close ally of Pence, who served as Messer’s finance chairman before launching his own campaign.

“Everybody thinks, ‘Oh, he’s not going to be involved,’” Bishop said when asked if Pence’s new pastime as a candidate takes him away from the mall. “He knows exactly what’s going on here,” she said, adding that she’s in communication with him every day.

“To the dealers, it’s a great model,” said another vendor named Susan, who was restocking her booth. “They collect sales tax for me, they do all the insurance, they do all the utilities, they deal with customers … I don’t have to worry about anything except bringing new merchandise.”

“And I hope you noticed, we’re really clean. That is one of Gregory’s pet peeves,” she added. A shopper looks over the merchandise at the Pence’s Exit 76 Antique Mall in Edinburgh, Ind., on April 6. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call) The eldest Pence

The oldest of six siblings, Pence served four years in the Marine Corps, experience that’s featured prominently in his ads. This is his first run for office, but he was often at his brother’s side during his campaigns — so much so that he’d sometimes be mistaken for the vice president.

Pence had previously worked for Marathon Oil and Unocal Corporation, then became vice president of Kiel Brothers Oil Company, the family’s gas station and convenience store business. In 2004, the company filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy and Greg resigned.