Invasive species state resources – arizona gas number density

This list of the most serious biotic pests and pathogens is maintained by the State (Arizona Department of Agriculture) and Federal ( USDA) regulatory agents. Their goal is to prevent the introduction and/or spread of these pests/pathogens in our state. The University of Arizona diagnosticians and Extension agents and State/Federal regulatory agents rely on the community to report any suspicious pests or pathogens found on the regulatory alerts.

Quagga mussel larvae, or veligers, were first confirmed in Lake Powell in late 2012 after routine water monitoring tests discovered mussel DNA in water samples taken from the vicinity of Antelope Point and the Glen Canyon Dam. As of early 2016, thousands of adult quagga mussels have been found in Lake Powell, attached to canyon walls, the Glen Canyon Dam, boats, and other underwater structures, especially in the southern portions of the lake. It is crucial to keep the mussels from moving from Lake Powell to other lakes and rivers. Utah and Arizona state laws require you to clean, drain, and dry your boat when leaving Lake Powell using self-decontamination procedures.

Help preserve the Sonoran Desert by removing buffelgrass, a highly invasive grass that threatens native plants and wildlife populations. Volunteers are needed to assist with buffelgrass pulls, held the second Saturday of each month, from Sept-May.

The Arizona Plant Diagnostic Network is designed to link growers and master gardeners with plant experts in your community and with plant scientists at the University of Arizona. These experts are available to answer questions about plant health and help identify new and emerging plant pests and pathogens in Arizona. The goal is to increase public awareness of incoming threats to the plants and produce in our State.

New state regulations to help prevent the spread of quagga mussels and zebra mussels went into effect in Mar 2010. These regulatory measures, known as "Director’s Orders," were authorized by the Aquatic Invasive Species Interdiction Act passed by the Arizona Legislature in 2009. The orders contain a list of aquatic invasive species for Arizona, a list of waters where aquatic invasive species are present, and mandatory conditions for the movement of watercraft.

invasive plant species that appeared in the 1st edition and several other species have been added. The booklet is not intended to provide a comprehensive list of all of Arizona’s invasive weeds, but rather, it illustrates a few invasive plants that have become, or have the potential to become, problematic in Arizona.

The Invaders Program was initiated in 2005 to tackle the rise of biological invasions by harmful exotic species of plants and animals, with an emphasis on seven species of interest. Since then, the program has expanded to include a broad number of invasive species within the Sonoran Desert, hands-on research, and education to community members. Our goals are to identify the impacts of invasives in our region, map the spread of these invasives, collaborate with eradication projects, and educate others about the resulting implications to the Sonoran Desert.