Is the saphonian bladeless wind turbine for real or a scam metabunk n game

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The system (SCEE) has a wheel (F) equipped with a series of blades arranged all around it. The wheel (F) turns in a pivoting connection about a fixed axle (L). electricity and magnetism worksheets high school Set on the axle (L), a support (E) attaches the end plates of a series of double-acting actuating cylinders (D). The cylinder rods of the latter are in a ball jointed connection with the body (A), the purpose of this being to offer the latter a maximum degree of freedom in space.

A rigid arm (C) is set on one side of the wheel (F) and held on the other side, in a pivoting connection, on a U‑shaped section piece (B). Having a circular satellite movement, the latter turns with the wheel (F) while at the same time sliding over a peripheral region of the body (A). When the wind blows against the body (A), the latter pivots with the section piece (B) and pushes on the cylinder rods of the actuating cylinders (D). Having a circular satellite movement, the section piece (B) turns, sliding over a peripheral region of the body (A), thus changing the fulcrum of the moment of the resultant force of the wind (the pivot connection of the section piece (B)) applied to the body (A). The cylinder rods of the actuating cylinders (D) will therefore be pulled and pushed, while at the same time having a cyclic translational movement.

Set on the axle (L), and a nacelle (J) chiefly contains a hydraulic motor (H) and an electric generator (G), which can be coupled via a speed multiplier. During the reciprocating movements of the pistons of the actuating cylinders (D), a set of valves allows for a one-way flow of hydraulic fluid inside "out and back" hydraulic circuits either by pulling or pushing. The "out and back" hydraulic circuits are also connected to the hydraulic motor (H).

Reading the patent it seems pretty clear that it’s working by utilizing a series of hydraulic cylinders which are pumping hydraulic fluid as the working medium. Running a hydrolic pump backwards, essentially, to extract energy from the wind. Fairly clever. You can see from the motion above that the various portions of the base plate on the moving portion are becoming closer and further from the fixed base plate and the hydraulic cylinders are between the two so you can imagine the pistons moving back and forth inside said cylinders and thus transmitting power.

To my eye the movement in the video above is not smooth enough to be as efficient as they are suggesting, but that’s gut feel not data. I’d also be concerned about the amount of point force the "thunking" motion causes in terms of wear and tear. Finally, having lived in high wind areas (gusts to 120mph+) and ice storms (up to 2" thick ice coating every individual branch), this current design doesn’t look nearly durable enough nor am I clear that it will work in natural winds (gusty).

I am highly skeptical about this project too. Not only I doubt the efficiency claims, but what I find absolutely impossible are the claims about scalability and cost. Saphon tells that mathematical models show the system is scalable to dimensions (or power?) of classical wind turbines. The biggest wind turbine has the diameter of 164m, and wind turbines with the diameter of 30m are already considered rather small. After seeing the latest Saphonian turbine model in works (it has about 1m in diameter), and seeing the eccentric forces it transmits to the mast, already at a rather mild wind, I have troubles imagining a dish of 2-3m, or even the same dish in a really strong wind. I do not believe there is an economical way to build a 30m dish or bigger.

They claim the Saphon turbine has 1.7 times the output of a regular wind turbine. I assume they speak about the same diameter. In that case, to achieve the power of a 30m diameter windmill, they would have to build a dish of 23m in diameter 30/sqrt(1.7) = 23. At the 164m windmill they would need a 126m dish. I would like to see them building it, and building it cheaper than the classical aerofoils. No way, on my mind.

If I am skeptical about the efficiency, I do not believe this claim at all. I see no way this complicated and massive system could be cheaper to produce than traditional wind turbines. Although they apparently did recently a demo to Microsoft representatives, they did not publish any data, and we do not know exactly how big the dish of the demo device is, and what is its output power at certain wind speed. electricity projects ks2 Hence it is hard to compare it with a specific classical wind turbines, but looking for the cost of small ones, I see that for example at Alibaba at turbines with blades of around 2 meters (therefore the circular area more then 10 times bigger than the demo dish) the prices start as low as some $160. Besides others, the turbines also use a very simple slim mast unlike the massive (yet still shaking) construction shown in the latest Saphon’s demo video – alone the mast would be much more expensive at Saphon.

Another thing, that I consider a warning sign, is the constant argumentation of Saphon that their system is inspired by the ancient Carthago sailboats, and using bionic research of fish and birds. Personally I see only a remote resemblance to the work of a sail, and even less I see where the bionic research was applied. These claims sound more like sales pitches with the sole purpose to impress an uneducated listener.

Since Saphon already has a fully functional prototype, and since they watch this thread, I hope they will react and publish some data, so that they can persuade us better about the viability of their concept. I do not demand anything that would endanger their pending patents or IP. All we need is the diameter of the demo dish (estimated to approximately 1 meter), and the power it generates at a specific wind speed. They can either give us the output power and RPM’s at several wind speeds (i.e. 3m/s, 6m/s, 10m/s), or just the power, RPM, and the wind speed values in ideal conditions.

Furthermore, it would be interesting to know what is the diameter of the 20kW turbines planned for the wind farm to be built in India until 2017. Traditional wind turbines have the rotor diameter of around 10 meters at the nominal power output of 20 kW at the wind speed of 10 m/s. So, if the Saphonian turbine is 2 times more efficient, the diameter of the dish should be 7 meters. I really wonder whether they are capable of building such a huge dish and a correspondingly strong and high mast or tower, to be 50% cheaper than existing turbines of the same power ( Alibaba lists prices of $15k-$30k for 20kW systems, if you ignore some suspiciously cheap offers starting around $1k).

EDIT: in the video below, the question about the maximum wind speed was asked during a conference in 2015. gas yourself in car Saphon seems to claim there is no upper limit, and that the Saphonian turbine poses less resistance to the wind than traditional turbines. That is a totally ridiculous and nonsensical claim, because the drag profile of the dish will be orders of magnitude higher, regardless how it moves. At strong winds, the axial and eccentric forces transmitted to the support will be clearly enormous, and far exceeding the forces at common systems.

In the video they also make clear the nominal power of the prototype is 1 kW. Existing 1 kW turbines have the rotor diameter of ~2.5m (area of 4.9m²). Theirs is ~1m (area of 0.8m²). It means they are not twice as efficient at the same area, but in fact six times more efficient than existing concepts! I wonder why they do not proudly tell it, and speak only about twice the output. Probably because it is physically simply impossible even at 100% efficiency – best turbine efficiencies are at 40%, so there is no way you could get six times more than that. The theoretical maximum is 59.3% given by the Betz’s law, but even if it did not apply to their turbine (which is questionable too), they could not exceed 100% anyway. More likely, the 1 kW claim at the prototype is strongly exaggerated, or calculated for a very strong wind force (that the dish or mast may not survive anyway).

They also continue to claim the Saphonian turbine transforms the axial back-and-fore movement through a system of hydraulic pistons to a radial motion. On the demo video I do not see any pistons – the dish rotates the eccentric axis or crankshaft mechanically, and it then transmits the rotative motion to the generator directly. I do not see any hydraulic system there. Though, in fact I consider it better, because it is doubtful that any high efficiency and durability could be achieved with a hydraulic transmission.

Another reason why I doubt their efficiency claims is the fact that their system uses only the drag force of the wind. Although it does it in an unconventional way, it is still mostly just the drag force like at ancient mills, or at ancient sailboats (that they like to use as their sources of inspiration anyway). It fails to take the advantage of the lift force, that we know at wings, modern sails, or … at modern wind turbines. q gastrobar leblon They could perhaps close the concave front of the dish with a flat cover, and incline the dish more, to transmit a bit more of aerodynamic lift to the shaft, and reducing so the the drag. Although it would be barely comparable to blade turbines, it could improve their efficiency a bit. However, it would still not solve one of the biggest problems the system has – the wobbling caused by the eccentricity. If the system rotated faster due to more lift and lower drag, it would make the wobbling only a bigger problem, and the turbine would break down even quicker.

Despite all the critics I wrote, I still do not think that their invention is an outright scam. I see a lot of work behind it, a lot of creativity, and also some nice engineering work. Although I remain very skeptical about the efficiency and cost claims, and see a bunch of other problems (especially the safety and the durability), I applaud them, and I think they deserve getting some funding to allow them continuing in the development, even if it should be just to show the world that this is not the way to go.

I am highly skeptical about this project too. Not only I doubt the efficiency claims, but what I find absolutely impossible are the claims about scalability and cost. Saphon tells that mathematical models show the system is scalable to dimensions (or power?) of classical wind turbines. The biggest wind turbine has the diameter of 164m, and wind turbines with the diameter of 30m are already considered rather small. After seeing the latest Saphonian turbine model in works (it has about 1m in diameter), and seeing the eccentric forces it transmits to the mast, already at a rather mild wind, I have troubles imagining a dish of 2-3m, or even the same dish in a really strong wind. I do not believe there is an economical way to build a 30m dish or bigger.

They claim the Saphon turbine has 1.7 times the output of a regular wind turbine. I assume they speak about the same diameter. In that case, to achieve the power of a 30m diameter windmill, they would have to build a dish of 23m in diameter 30/sqrt(1.7) = 23. At the 164m windmill they would need a 126m dish. gas emoji meaning I would like to see them building it, and building it cheaper than the classical aerofoils. No way, on my mind.

Click to expand…Yes, the complexity of the movement is indeed hypnotizing, but only until you realize that all that complicated mechanism is needed only to keep the eagle painted on the dish vertically. From the point of view of the functionality or the efficiency, the dish could rotate as well. It would have absolutely no other impact, than the loss of the phony visual effect of a "non-rotating" dish.

And once you realize you do not need any vertically standing logo for harvesting the wind energy, you can simplify the mechanism to a very trivial construction, saving so the cost, weight, reducing energy losses, wear, and considerably reducing the number of parts that can break. All you need for achieving the same movement is just a dish with an axis that is attached to it eccentrically and diagonally, and firmly (no bearing, no joints). I made a simple model with a small plastic dish and a pencil. I’ve just cut one end of the pencil at approximately 45° and glued it to the back of the dish eccentrically. I did it in 20 seconds without any measurement or testing, so the angles and positions are not 100% identical or ideal, but yet, in the video below you can see the movement is the same as at the Saphonian dish (although I just turn it irregularly by shaky hands).

Yes, the complexity of the movement is indeed hypnotizing, but only until you realize that all that complicated mechanism is needed only to keep the eagle painted on the dish vertically. From the point of view of the functionality or the efficiency, the dish could rotate as well. It would have absolutely no other impact, than the loss of the phony visual effect of a "non-rotating" dish.

And once you realize you do not need any vertically standing logo for harvesting the wind energy, you can simplify the mechanism to a very trivial construction, saving so the cost, weight, reducing energy losses, wear, and considerably reducing the number of parts that can break. All you need for achieving the same movement is just a dish with an axis that is attached to it eccentrically and diagonally, and firmly (no bearing, no joints). I made a simple model with a small plastic dish and a pencil. I’ve just cut one end of the pencil at approximately 45° and glued it to the back of the dish eccentrically. I did it in 20 seconds without any measurement or testing, so the angles and positions are not 100% identical or ideal, but yet, in the video below you can see the movement is the same as at the Saphonian dish (although I just turn it irregularly by shaky hands).