Just testing the waters uber drivers forum zyklon b gas effects

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The object of the game is to make money. Driving to a destination without a passenger is called "dead heading" or "dead miles" and that’s something you want to avoid. When you accept a rider, you then drive to that destination to pick them up. Typically, drivers won’t accept riders who are more then ten minutes out. Depending on your location and where the rider might be hailing a ride, it could be worth it. Uber does pay out a "long pick up fee" but it’s not a lot. I drove 20 minutes to pick up a rider and was paid out $10.56 (8.33 miles= $8.44 and time 11.77 min= $2.12). The rider ended up needing a ride 60 miles away which turned out to be a $94 fare plus he tipped me $19. So it worked out in my favor. Sometimes you’ll drive for 15 minutes and the rider wants to go three blocks up the road.

Anyway. Once you have a rider, and you’ve dropped them off, there is no sense in driving around aimlessly looking for more riders. The idea is to get off the road as soon as it’s safe to do so, stay in well-lit areas and park. Shut the engine off and wait for the next ping. Some times (and like I’ve said it’s all depending on location etc) you’ll get a ping right away, some times you’ll wait a while. But the goal is to drive as little as possible, burn as little fuel as possible and keep the wear and tear down on the vehicle. All that is costing you money. Also, limit how many snacks you buy at gas stations and try to eat out less frequently. All that chips away at your profits you just spent 9 hours making.

Try to drive conservatively as you can. Gunning it through yellow lights, speeding and excessive braking will, not only beat up your Uber but it’s unnecessary. You don’t want riders complaining of your driving. That’ll get you shut down. And on that note, by a dash cam!

The object of the game is to make money. Driving to a destination without a passenger is called "dead heading" or "dead miles" and that’s something you want to avoid. When you accept a rider, you then drive to that destination to pick them up. Typically, drivers won’t accept riders who are more then ten minutes out. Depending on your location and where the rider might be hailing a ride, it could be worth it. Uber does pay out a "long pick up fee" but it’s not a lot. I drove 20 minutes to pick up a rider and was paid out $10.56 (8.33 miles= $8.44 and time 11.77 min= $2.12). The rider ended up needing a ride 60 miles away which turned out to be a $94 fare plus he tipped me $19. So it worked out in my favor. Sometimes you’ll drive for 15 minutes and the rider wants to go three blocks up the road.

Anyway. Once you have a rider, and you’ve dropped them off, there is no sense in driving around aimlessly looking for more riders. The idea is to get off the road as soon as it’s safe to do so, stay in well-lit areas and park. Shut the engine off and wait for the next ping. Some times (and like I’ve said it’s all depending on location etc) you’ll get a ping right away, some times you’ll wait a while. But the goal is to drive as little as possible, burn as little fuel as possible and keep the wear and tear down on the vehicle. All that is costing you money. Also, limit how many snacks you buy at gas stations and try to eat out less frequently. All that chips away at your profits you just spent 9 hours making.

Try to drive conservatively as you can. Gunning it through yellow lights, speeding and excessive braking will, not only beat up your Uber but it’s unnecessary. You don’t want riders complaining of your driving. That’ll get you shut down. And on that note, by a dash cam!

The object of the game is to make money. Driving to a destination without a passenger is called "dead heading" or "dead miles" and that’s something you want to avoid. When you accept a rider, you then drive to that destination to pick them up. Typically, drivers won’t accept riders who are more then ten minutes out. Depending on your location and where the rider might be hailing a ride, it could be worth it. Uber does pay out a "long pick up fee" but it’s not a lot. I drove 20 minutes to pick up a rider and was paid out $10.56 (8.33 miles= $8.44 and time 11.77 min= $2.12). The rider ended up needing a ride 60 miles away which turned out to be a $94 fare plus he tipped me $19. So it worked out in my favor. Sometimes you’ll drive for 15 minutes and the rider wants to go three blocks up the road.

Anyway. Once you have a rider, and you’ve dropped them off, there is no sense in driving around aimlessly looking for more riders. The idea is to get off the road as soon as it’s safe to do so, stay in well-lit areas and park. Shut the engine off and wait for the next ping. Some times (and like I’ve said it’s all depending on location etc) you’ll get a ping right away, some times you’ll wait a while. But the goal is to drive as little as possible, burn as little fuel as possible and keep the wear and tear down on the vehicle. All that is costing you money. Also, limit how many snacks you buy at gas stations and try to eat out less frequently. All that chips away at your profits you just spent 9 hours making.