Keeping advent some daily practices the homely hours gas 2015

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So many great Jesse Tree options are out there, but I do think these Scandinavian style ornaments Bley painted to correspond with Rachel Chaney’s Jesus Tree are especially lovely. Because my family already has a morning prayer routine going, we aren’t going to follow her whole devotional. Instead, I’ve put together t his list of Scriptures to correspond with the ornaments (all free for your use). We’ll read the Scripture and hang the ornament before we go into our normal morning prayer.

• Advent is a time for peace, quiet, and waiting, but it’s also a battle. la gas leak Between December 1st and 24th,everything in our culture is in a frenzy of keeping “Consumertide.” It is the High Feast Days of the Mall Year (though, of course, by the grace of God, still mingled with lights of truth and beauty). With that in mind, why do I expect it to feel easy and peaceful to keep Advent and to resist the all-consuming pressures of “Consumertide?” The ‘waiting’ of Advent does not mean passivity. Peace does not mean ease. This, too, is a time to put on the “full armour of God.”

• A good Advent does not mean that I will feel spiritual and transcendent and in tune emotionally with the “magic of the season.” I really appreciated this post from Auntie Leila from Like Mother, Like Daughter, on “What Advent is Really About,” especially the following:”… the general tendency, greatly aggravated by our modern mindset and its hold over us, to emphasize how we feel threatens to derail what could be a good trend. Even if we don’t think of ourselves as particularly modern, we retain modernism’s imprint, thinking that our reaction to things, measured by our emotions, is the only sign we can trust. Are we spending a lot of time and energy (and, actually, money*) watching ourselves feel something about Advent? Are we busily monitoring how we are doing with our religious efforts? Are we taking note of whether we are taking note? Very importantly, are we experiencing defeat when we don’t have what we consider the right feelings — the ones that the (well intentioned) people want us to feel?” Make sure to read the whole post (and every other post on Like Mother, Like Daughter).

• In light of that, while a good Advent doesn’t necessarily mean I will feel like praying or reading Scripture, a good Advent will objectively mean more prayer and Scripture in my home. Advent is the perfect time to jump start the habit of daily family prayer. This is the start of the church’s new year — it can be a new church year resolution!

• Lastly, a good Advent means more humility. No matter how we keep Advent, the Lord still comes to us. gas quality by brand Advent is not about me feeling like a good mother, with lots of perfectly put together plans (In fact, I generally only carry out 10% of my Advent plans and that’s because my kids make sure we light the candles every night and sing “O Come, O Come Emmanuel.”) Really, at the end of the day, we’re just supposed to wait. May we wait well this upcoming Advent and “may every heart prepare Him room.”

* For candles, we bought this kit to make beeswax candles this year. If you’re looking for other quality beeswax candles, these ones from St. Andrew’s look great (look at how tall they are! They will definitely last through Advent). But, if you want to pay less, we’ve used these in the past. They do melt quickly, but they do the job (if you don’t keep them lit throughout supper). And, if you are getting your Advent plans together at the last minute, we’ve found candles at Hallmark, managing to snag them for our Advent wreath/candle blessing a half hour before church started.

Collect: O Lord Jesus Christ, who at thy first coming didst send thy messenger to prepare thy way before thee; Grant that the ministers and stewards of thy mysteries may likewise so prepare and make ready thy way, by turning the hearts of the disobedient to the wisdom of the just, that at thy second coming to judge the world we may be found an acceptable people in thy sight, who livest and reignest with the Father and the Holy Spirit ever, on God, world without end. Amen.” Saints Days and Other Observances: Monday, December 17: O Antiphons Begin: Since at least the 6th century, the “Great O” Antiphons are traditional verses added to the singing of the Magnificat. They each center around one of the names given to the Messiah in the book of Isaiah. And, the first letter of each name creates an acrostic “E-R-O-C-R-A-S,” a Latin phrase that means “Tomorrow, I will be there.” This Advent booklet contains prayers for the O Antiphons. And, you can also print out these O Antiphon Ornaments. To listen…

Auntie Leila wisely counsels: “The Church has provided us with all we need and we don’t have to manufacture any feelings about it. gas station Follow her lead in worship. That is, follow her in the celebration of the mysteries, the readings appointed for each day and each hour, and the prayers that gently and peacefully direct our gaze where it needs to be. gasbuddy near me Be attentive: Wisdom! Bring this objectivity into the home with simple, liturgy-related traditions (and yes, a few little crafts, perhaps, and I will touch on those later) that appeal to you and your husband. Keep things old-fashioned so that, paradoxically, they remain timeless and universal. Make your devotions few and meaningful to your time and place. (E.g. if you are Swedish, then go for the daring St. Lucy crown of lit candles on a toddling girl’s head this December 13, but if you are not, don’t worry about it too much.)” Well, part of my family is Swedish. When I was reading this, I thought to myself, I should ask my Swedish cousin how she celebrates…

In my Advent Hymns and Carols post, I suggested that one way to keep Advent is to save up the Christmas carols (as much as possible) until Christmastide. But, I do understand why someone would want to start listening to Christmas carols right after Halloween. I sympathize with all the Christmas music over-eagerness. It’s because Christmas music is made to last and it’s made to be shared. It’s because in modern America, Christmas music is really the only folk music tradition that we still treasure on a large scale. gas in oil mower And that is our loss. Folk music is music that is passed down from generation to generation, music that is shared and interpreted, while still keeping a recognizable integrity. At Christmastime, instead of constant novelty in music, we delight in the familiarity of the old — “Silent Night,” “Carol of the Bells,” “Joy to the World,” “White Christmas.” We enjoy hearing musicians interpret a song within a tradition, within a conversation — it’s just “new enough.” At Christmas, we share music with those who are…

As we prepare for Advent beginning on December 2, I thought I would post the resources that we have available on this site for daily Advent prayer and Scripture reading. Advent Wreath: If you do nothing else for Advent, buy an Advent wreath and candles.* We use this prayer and Scripture reading booklet from our church every year. We light the candles before we start to eat dinner and then follow the readings and prayers. Jesus/Jesse Tree So many great Jesse Tree options are out there, but I do think these Scandinavian style ornaments Bley painted to correspond with Rachel Chaney’s Jesus Tree are especially lovely. electricity symbols ks3 Because my family already has a morning prayer routine going, we aren’t going to follow her whole devotional. Instead, I’ve put together this list of Scriptures to correspond with the ornaments (all free for your use). We’ll read the Scripture and hang the ornament before we go into our normal morning prayer. O Antiphons: If you’re following the Advent Wreath Booklet, you’ll see that it also includes prayers for the Great…

Collect: O Lord, we beseech thee, absolve thy people from their offences; that through thy bountiful goodness we may all be delivered from the bands of those sins, which by our frailty we have committed. Grant this, O heavenly Father, for the sake of Jesus Christ, our blessed Lord and Saviour. Amen.” Saints and Feast Days: Sunday, November 11: Martin of Tours (transferred to Tuesday, the 13th) Saint Martin of Tours was born in what is now Hungary between 315 and 330. His father was a soldier and early in Martin’s life, his family was transferred to Italy. At fifteen, because he was a veteran’s son, he was forced to become a soldier. Sulpicius Severus described his early life in the military (you can read his Life of St. Martin here): Martin was a professional soldier, but managed to keep himself free from the vices in which so often soldiers indulge. He was extremely kind toward his fellow-soldiers, and held them in great affection; while his patience and humility surpassed what seemed possible for…