Kent’s camp visiting rock hill, s.c. – page 3 – all metalshaping electricity receiver

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I’m going out on a limb here, but this is what I took from the displays and training at Kent’s recent visit. Because of the silver appearance and content of the three alloys and their melting temperatures that he demonstrated, and the choice to use 850 degrees F. as the deciding factor, I am choosing to describe one of his alloys as ”Silver Soldering’ and the other two as ‘Silver Brazing’.

The first picture I incorrectly labeled in an earlier post as Silver Brazing as I did not witness this demonstration first hand. electricity lessons for 5th grade It is Kents filler rod #ABS-0063 and has a melting point 780 deg.F., and is non corrosive flux cored. It is primarily used to join most common aluminum alloys (with the exception of 5005 & 5052.) Photos on Kents website indicates that it can also be used for copper &/or brass. I consider this to be Silver Soldering.

The second picture is the only one I took of the demo on using Kent’s ABS-0229 non corrosive flux cored filler rod. It has a melting point of 1160-1180 deg.F. In the photo, Kent is adding a simple cover patch to an aluminum air intake to better display the tinning technic that he prefers. gas 10 8 schlauchadapter Here he is using a piece of 3003H14, but his website indicates that this filler rod can be used for adding several alloys of fittings to aircraft tanks.

This third set of pictures is showing Kent tinning and adding an exterior patch to a steel turbo inlet tube using his ABS-0064 flux coated filler rod. It’s melting temperature is 1020 deg.F., and can be used for steel, stainless, copper, brass, silver, gold and German silver. 5 gases in the atmosphere This filler rod has a 55% silver content. As with the other filler rods mentioned, Kent strongly advises cleaning the surface with a stainless steel brush or sandpaper and welding with a ‘soft’ flame.

I’m going out on a limb here, but this is what I took from the displays and training at Kent’s recent visit. electricity 101 powerpoint Because of the silver appearance and content of the three alloys and their melting temperatures that he demonstrated, and the choice to use 850 degrees F. as the deciding factor, I am choosing to describe one of his alloys as ”Silver Soldering’ and the other two as ‘Silver Brazing’.

The first picture I incorrectly labeled in an earlier post as Silver Brazing as I did not witness this demonstration first hand. It is Kents filler rod #ABS-0063 and has a melting point 780 deg.F., and is non corrosive flux cored. It is primarily used to join most common aluminum alloys (with the exception of 5005 & 5052.) Photos on Kents website indicates that it can also be used for copper &/or brass. I consider this to be Silver Soldering.

The second picture is the only one I took of the demo on using Kent’s ABS-0229 non corrosive flux cored filler rod. It has a melting point of 1160-1180 deg.F. gas 76 station In the photo, Kent is adding a simple cover patch to an aluminum air intake to better display the tinning technic that he prefers. Here he is using a piece of 3003H14, but his website indicates that this filler rod can be used for adding several alloys of fittings to aircraft tanks. Yes, see above.

This third set of pictures is showing Kent tinning and adding an exterior patch to a steel turbo inlet tube using his ABS-0064 flux coated filler rod. gas oil ratio units It’s melting temperature is 1020 deg.F., and can be used for steel, stainless, copper, brass, silver, gold and German silver. This filler rod has a 55% silver content. As with the other filler rods mentioned, Kent strongly advises cleaning the surface with a stainless steel brush or sandpaper and welding with a ‘soft’ flame.

Yes, I used a stainless overlay patch for repairing this plated steel hydraulic tube that had a cable chafe through it. origin electricity login Yes, welding is an option but not for this because of "weld fire-scale" which would require sandblasting and repeated washing for return to use. My years of doing hydraulic repairs for the local, and very rural, earth movers has given me a proven success rate. The low temps and very high strength of this silver braze make it the ideal choice – since 1973, in fact.