Lafayette, indiana – wikipedia gas dryer vs electric dryer

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When European explorers arrived at the area around what is now Tippecanoe County, it was inhabited by a tribe of Miami Indians known as the Ouiatenon or Weas. In 1717, the French government established Fort Ouiatenon across the Wabash River and three miles (5 km) south of present-day Lafayette. The fort became the center of trade for fur trappers, merchants and Indians. An annual reenactment and festival known as Feast of the Hunters’ Moon takes place there each autumn. [9]

The town of Lafayette was platted in May 1825 by William Digby, a trader. It was designated as the county seat of the newly formed Tippecanoe County the following year. Like many frontier towns, Lafayette was named for General Lafayette, a French officer who significantly aided George Washington’s Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War. Lafayette toured the United electricity jeopardy powerpoint States in 1824 and 1825.

In its earliest days, Lafayette was a shipping center on the Wabash River. In 1838, Henry Leavitt Ellsworth, the first United States Patent Commissioner, published a booklet titled Valley of the Upper Wabash, Indiana, with Hints on Its Agricultural Advantages, to promote settlement of the region. By 1845, Ellsworth had purchased 93,000 acres (380 km 2) of farmland in and around Lafayette and moved there from Connecticut to supervise land sales. [10] By 1847 Ellsworth was distributing broadsides looking for farmers to purchase his farmland. [11] He became president of the Tippecanoe County Agricultural Society in April 1851 – despite some local resentment over what was called the Yale Crowd – but he was defeated the same year when he ran for the Indiana House of Representatives. [12] Ellsworth Street and Ellsworth Historic District are named for the early real estate developer. [13]

Lafayette was the site of the first official air mail delivery in the United States, which took place on August 17, 1859, when John Wise piloted a balloon starting on the Lafayette courthouse grounds. Wise hoped to reach New York; however, weather conditions forced electricity prices going up the balloon down near Crawfordsville, Indiana, and the mail reached its final destination by train. In 1959, the U.S. Postal Service issued a 7¢ airmail stamp commemorating the centennial of the event. [14]

Lafayette is located at 40°24′38″N 86°52′29″W  /  40.410585°N 86.874681°W  / 40.410585; -86.874681 (40.410585, −86.874681) [15] and lies in Fairfield and Wea Townships. Elevation at the court house is 550 feet (168 m), but city elevations range from a little over 500 feet (150 m) at the Wabash River to approximately 700 feet (210 m) in the areas of Murdock Park and Columbian Park.

In recent years, temperatures in Lafayette have ranged from an average low of 17 °F (−8 °C) in January to a high of 86 °F (30 °C) in July, although a record low of −33 °F (−36 °C) was recorded in January 1985 and again in January 1994; and a record high of 105 °F (41 °C) was recorded in June 1988. Average monthly precipitation ranged from 1.58 inches (40 mm) in February to 4.24 inches (108 mm) in June. [17]

Lafayette is the larger principal city of the Lafayette-Frankfort CSA, a Combined Statistical Area gas jockey that includes the Lafayette metropolitan area ( Benton, Carroll, and Tippecanoe counties) and the Frankfort micropolitan area ( Clinton County), [20] [21] [22] which had a combined population of 212,408 at the 2000 census. [5] 2010 census [ edit ]

As of the census [3] of 2010, there were 67,140 people, 28,545 households, and 15,863 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,420.3 inhabitants per square mile (934.5/km 2). There were 31,260 housing units at an average density of 1,126.9 per square mile (435.1/km 2). The racial makeup of the city was 74.2% White, 11.2% African American, 0.4% Native American, 1 Asian, 0.0% from other races, and 2.7% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 16.3% of the population.

There were 28,545 households of which 29.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 36.7% were married couples living together, 13.7% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.2% had a male householder with no wife present, and 44.4% were non-families. 34.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.30 and the average family size was 3.00.

As of the census [5] of 2000, there were 56,397 people, 24,060 households, and 13,666 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,806.5 people per square mile (1,083.9/km 2). There were 25,602 housing units at an average density of 1,274.1 per square mile (492.0/km 2). The racial makeup of the city was 88.91% White; 3.22% African American; 0.37% Native American; 1.22% Asian; 0.04% Pacific Islander; 4.61% from other races, and gas equations chemistry 1.62% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 9.11% of the population.

There were 24,060 households out of which 27.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them; 42.5% were married couples living together; 10.2% had a female householder with no husband present; and 43.2% were non-families. 33.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.31 individuals and the average family size was 2.98.

The median income for a household in the city was $35,859, and the median income for a family was $45,480. Males had a median income of $32,892 versus $23,049 for females. The per capita income for the city was $19,217. About 8.0% of families and 12.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.8% of those under age 18 and 4.6% of those age 65 or over.

10 minutes North of Lafayette lies Prophet Rock, the landmark where the Prophet Tenskwatawa, the half brother of Tecumseh, stood watch encouraging the local Shawnee Native Americans to fight against the encamped army forces of William Henry Harrison in the Battle Of Tippecanoe in 1811. Tenskwatawa was a spiritual leader, but not a military man. His brother was out of town as the U.S. Army forces marched North, with hopes to destroy Prophetstown. Tenskwatawa had sought gas city indiana car show to have a meeting with Harrison to discuss how to avoid going to war. In the evening before the war, he sought a spiritual vision that led him to believe the assignation of Harrison must be done. Early in the morning of November 6, the warriors attacked Harrison’s militia and war ensued. The warriors fell weak in supplies against the militia, and succumbed. Prophetstown was taken over where the militia stole supplies and burnt it down. The rock from where Tenskwatawa still stands over the battlefield, though now covered with much taller trees. You can access the rock by either scaling it from the small parking lot immediately in front or hiking the ridge line that leads to the top. [39] Headstone of Martin P. Jenners [ edit ]

The Martin Jenners headstone is located at the Spring Vale Cemetery in Lafayette. [40] Jenners was a Civil War veteran [41] [42] [43] who was known as the first white person born in Tippecanoe County and as an outspoken atheist. [44] Originally located in Greenbush Cemetery, [45] his headstone is unique because he had it placed in the cemetery fourteen years before his death, and it has the following inscription: My only objection to religion is that it is not true. No preaching, no praying, no psalm singing on this lot. Jenners’ headstone goes on mention two verses that he apparently believed to contradict each other, hence making the Bible untrue. The verses are I Corinthians 15:52, which talks about believers being raised from the dead in a twinkling of an eye, and Isaiah pictures electricity pylons 26:14, which states They are now dead, they live no more; their spirits do not rise. The headstone received national attention at the time, despite attempts to have it removed, and it continued to draw visitors from around the country many years after his death. [46] [47] Jenners’ headstone inscription has been cited by believers as an example of the Bible being taken out of context. [48] [49] [50]