Linksys debuts cheaper dual-band velop wi-fi mesh system – general discussion discussions on appleinsider forums 4 gases in the atmosphere

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Limited to dual-band connectivity, the new Velop family member is smaller than the tri-band iteration, but includes a number of advanced mesh networking features. The nodes, for example, are AC1300 devices with dual-band dual stream (2×2) capabilities supporting 802.11ac, offering combined speed up to 1300 Mbps. The devices feature MU-MIMO radio configuration, modular wired/wireless design, integration with Velop mesh technology, Amazon Alexa compatibility and more.

Along with connecting to each other via wired or wireless technologies to form a blanket of Wi-Fi coverage, each node can also act as a parent or client access point, allowing users to expand on existing systems as their wireless needs grow. For those who already have a Velop outfit, the dual-band version is interoperable with tri-band hardware, making extensions to existing wireless infrastructure easy.

As with the tri-band version, the new dual-band devices are controlled via app, feature "spot finder" technology for optimal node placement, boast the ability to self-heal a constructed network if a node should go offline and run an automatic update cycle.

The new dual-band Velop will be sold in one-, two- and three-pack configurations and is available for pre-order today through Linksys for $129, $199 and $299, respectively. Pre-orders are expected to launch on Amazon later today. Linksys is in talks to sell Velop Dual-Band through the Apple store, but for now Apple customers are relegated to the more expensive tri-band offerings.

I find the wifi/ networking space all quite confusing, and really don’t know what to make about Apple abandoning it. For all their "we make peoples’ lives better with better products" and "be true to ourselves as Apple" I sure am not seeing that in this case. While wifi and home networking was something quite techy in 1998 or so, home networks including wifi seem to me to be more like a simple utility. My house has electricity, water, and sewer service, all of which I pay a fee for. The electrician had to put in wires, the plumber the pipes, and that’s it. Internet service, and wifi in a home, shouldn’t be this mysterious.

OK, after that, I get that speed is important so I can stream 4k video, and along side that, security so someone ins’t uploading the kiddie porn on my IP address (or breaking into my home devices to steal passwords.) What better company to promise security than Apple? And are they promising to make my life better? To use their products in my home, I have to understand spectrum usage, bands? Find a company that isn’t going to fold next month, or is Evil like FB, the Google, or Amazon? And a user interface that requires an EE degree? Yuck.

I find the wifi/ networking space all quite confusing, and really don’t know what to make about Apple abandoning it. For all their "we make peoples’ lives better with better products" and "be true to ourselves as Apple" I sure am not seeing that in this case…

Regarding their leaving the router space, it’s because Apple still runs like a small company. They can dedicate engineers to boring shit like laser printers, displays, and wifi routers, or they can revolutionize the world with iPads and Airpods. They don’t have enough engineers to do both and if they did the company would grow so large that it wouldn’t really be Apple anymore.

But my water and electricity and sewage are all run by horrible providers too. My cable modem from comcast is remarkably stable. I think they’ll sell me a wifi router too, but I really haven’t needed this because I had reliable and trustworthy airports. I’d kinda like a baked in VPN service too, but I’m pretty sure comcast wants nothing to do with that. In fact, I have every expectation that comcast is watching my stream quite carefully, and with net neutrality being killed off, I expect them to be making me "exciting new offers." I’m lucky that there is a competitor (Century Link) but their pricing is incomprehensible. If they would simply offer "$50/mo, free equipment to try it out, cancel after 90 days, or opt in after that" I’d do so. But they want to bundle stuff I dont want, need or use.

I find the wifi/ networking space all quite confusing, and really don’t know what to make about Apple abandoning it. For all their "we make peoples’ lives better with better products" and "be true to ourselves as Apple" I sure am not seeing that in this case…

Regarding their leaving the router space, it’s because Apple still runs like a small company. They can dedicate engineers to boring shit like laser printers, displays, and wifi routers, or they can revolutionize the world with iPads and Airpods. They don’t have enough engineers to do both and if they did the company would grow so large that it wouldn’t really be Apple anymore.

The experience you describe at the end is honestly not far off from Plume, though. They’d make a "plum" acquisition target for Apple IMO, kind of a hands-off Beats style arrangement.In the 1950, the United States built an actual superhighway system. It seems odd we can’t solve the internet provider problem. Apple abandoned the effort (and your small company comment is well taken as to why.)

I find the wifi/ networking space all quite confusing, and really don’t know what to make about Apple abandoning it. For all their "we make peoples’ lives better with better products" and "be true to ourselves as Apple" I sure am not seeing that in this case…

Regarding their leaving the router space, it’s because Apple still runs like a small company. They can dedicate engineers to boring shit like laser printers, displays, and wifi routers, or they can revolutionize the world with iPads and Airpods. They don’t have enough engineers to do both and if they did the company would grow so large that it wouldn’t really be Apple anymore.

The experience you describe at the end is honestly not far off from Plume, though. They’d make a "plum" acquisition target for Apple IMO, kind of a hands-off Beats style arrangement.In the 1950, the United States built an actual superhighway system. It seems odd we can’t solve the internet provider problem. Apple abandoned the effort (and your small company comment is well taken as to why.)