List of schoolhouse rock! episodes – wikipedia la gasolina

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A young boy portrayed as a superhero (later redesigned as "Schoolhouse Rocky," the franchise mascot), shows his skeptical older sister the importance of the digit 0 as well as multiplication by powers of 10. This song was voted #11 on the 30th Anniversary DVD’s Top 25.

This short came out two years after the Public Health Cigarette Smoking Act had prohibited cigarette advertising; it did not, however, prohibit the depiction of smoking in fiction, even in children’s programming, so long as it was not a sponsored tie-in. In the short, Number Nine puffs a cigar throughout. ABC Broadcast Standards and Practices, after initially rejecting the short for this reason, relented and allowed the short to air when it accepted that the cat was a villain and would not encourage children to smoke. It remained in rotation through the rest of the series run.

A song of the same topic was proposed by Dave Frishberg, but denied. The song, a parody of Shaft and other blaxploitation films and songs, features a young boy who learns about verbs from a movie starring his favorite superhero, Verb. This song was voted #24 on the 30th Anniversary DVD’s Top 25.

This song marked Jack Sheldon’s debut in the series and was voted the #1 best song from the Top 25 on the 30th Anniversary DVD. In a railyard, a train conductor shows us how conjunctions work by hooking up boxcars with one of three conjunction boxcars: AND (a red boxcar), BUT (a yellow tank car), and OR (a green hopper car). This is the episode in which neither a steam nor a diesel locomotive are depicted. This episode served as inspiration for a Norfolk Southern rail television ads that took place in the early to mid 2010s.

This song teaches about interjections through three stories: an ill child reacting to a shot of medication, a woman rejecting a suitor’s advances, and a group of irate fans shouting non-obscene words in response to an interception at a football game. The songs chorus quotes the Hallelujah Chorus from Handel’s Messiah. Producer Tom Yohe’s daughter Lauren provides the closing line: "Darn! That’s the end!" This song was voted #5 on the 30th Anniversary DVD’s Top 25.

A young girl and her turtle friend go camping in the forest, using adjectives to describe people, places and things they encounter. This episode is arguably best known for the scene where a tall girl stomps on a small boy as he is laughing at how tall she is growing, not realizing that he is shrinking. This song was voted #14 on the 30th Anniversary DVD’s Top 25.

Pronouns are stressed by a trio with long names: Rufus Xavier Sarsaparilla, his sister Rafaela Gabriela Sarsaparilla and their friend (and narrator) Albert Andreas Armadillo, along with their pets consisting of a kangaroo, an aardvark and a rhinoceros. This song was voted #15 on the 30th Anniversary DVD’s Top 25.

This song teaches about the opening to the United States Constitution, with its preamble set to music. When writing this song, they had to remove a small section of the preamble to make the song rhyme. This song was voted #6 on the 30th Anniversary DVD’s Top 25.

A proposed transportation bill, depressed about the long and arduous legislative process and eager to be signed into law, sits on the steps to Capitol Hill and laments his plight to a young boy standing nearby, explaining the legislative process along the way. To his delight, the bill is signed into law at the end of the song. This song was voted #2 on the 30th Anniversary DVD’s Top 25.

This song teaches about Immigration in America, using the extant analogy of a melting pot to describe how multiple cultures assimilated into each other over the course of American history. This song was voted #19 on the 30th Anniversary DVD’s Top 25.

In a play on the adage " Necessity is the mother of invention," great inventors are reimagined as children conceiving ideas in response to needs their mothers had (such as Elias Howe’s invention of the sewing machine to help his mother sew, Thomas Edison’s perfection of the light bulb to help his mother see in the dark, or in a more humorous example, the Wright Brothers assembling the first airplane out of odds and ends to get away from their nagging mother wanting them to clean out the garage). This song was voted #20 on the 30th Anniversary DVD’s Top 25.

This song teaches about our solar system, as explored by the fabulous titular character, an extraterrestrial character with a rocket tail skirt, wings, bubblegum pink hair, and a humanoid head who explores the solar system, meant to represent a comet. (Though she bears a resemblance to a human, due to her dress and rocket booster skirt, she is a cyborg, and considers humans to be "weird.") Similar to the later Computer Rock series, Interplanet Janet has since become outdated, due to Pluto being included as the farthest planet from the sun, though its placement in the song could allow for it to be easily be edited out without any inconsistencies. (Pluto was closer to the sun than Neptune between 1979 and 1999; it was subsequently reclassified as a dwarf planet upon the discovery of similarly-sized Eris in 2006, long after the series left television; it should be noted, however, that Pluto’s reclassification was not universally accepted by the public.) This song was voted #8 on the 30th Anniversary DVD’s Top 25.

Some time after 1987, "The Greatest Show on Earth" was pulled from broadcast after Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus objected to the name, as the circus owned a trademark on the phrase. It did not air on television during the 1990s revival, nor was it included on most VHS releases after that date. On the DVD release of the series, it is included as a separate lost episode, using the name "The Weather Show."

This song teaches about the computer, introducing the recurring characters Scooter Computer and Mr. Chips. (This episode was left off the DVD release, reportedly due to ABC losing the master tape. Darrell Stern, the voice of Scooter Computer, preserved a copy on VHS and posted it to YouTube. [3])

Scooter Computer explains the basics of binary code and programming languages, and how those languages (mentioning the then-ubiquitous BASIC as an example) serve as an intermediary between the binary machine language the computer uses and the human English language.

An aspiring country musician consults a banker on how to raise enough money to buy the equipment she needs to become a star; the banker introduces her to the banking system, suggesting a savings account that will earn interest, or a loan with a 10 percent flat interest rate. The punchline is that when she does buy the equipment, her farm lacks the electricity to operate it, with the singer advising the listener to use "a little bit of common sense." This song was voted #18 on the 30th Anniversary DVD’s Top 25, the only episode not from the 1970s to make the top 25.

A small, cute, sweet, and portly clown-like Vaudeville tap dancer named Max and his 5 girlfriends, Tracy (dark skin), Annie (blonde hair), Kathy (tan skin), Joy (orange hair), and Natalie (red hair) explain how taxes are collected and how the revenue from those taxes is used. It is performed at Broadway.