Map – official minecraft wiki electricity and magnetism study guide 8th grade

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In the Legacy Console Edition, the player spawns with a map in their inventory upon creating a new world. Maps also contain the player’s current coordinates at the top. In the Bedrock Edition, the player can enable the option to spawn with a map when creating a new world.

Crafting a map creates an empty map. The map will be drawn for the first time when it is held and used (with use item). This map can then be adjusted to different zoom levels. After conversion to a drawn map item, it starts to draw a top-down view of the player’s surroundings, with North pointing to the top of the map. A pointed oval pointer indicates the player’s position on the map, and will move in real time as the player moves across the terrain shown on the map. The map will not center on the player when created, rather, the world is broken up into large invisible grid squares, and the map will display the area of whichever grid square it is in when it is first used. [1] For example, if a player uses a new map in a certain grid square, and then moves a distance away and uses another fresh map but is still within the same grid square, the maps will appear identical. To make a map that is not identical to the first one, the player would have to move outside of the edges of the first map (because then they would be in a new grid square). This way, no two maps will ever partially overlap and every map will only display a fixed area.

To record the world on a map, that specific map item must be held in the player’s hands while the player moves around the world. The world will be recorded as-is during exploration, meaning that if the world is modified, a player must revisit the area while holding the map in order to update the map’s view. Maps can also be cloned. A map’s parameters are fixed when the map is first used, meaning the map does not remain centered on the player—the drawing snaps to a pre-set grid.

Other players will only be displayed on the map if they have a map in their inventory cloned from the one being looked at. When placing a map into an item frame, the map will display with a green pointer shown at the location of the item frame. This is to help the player see where they are in relation to the area that the map is showing. If the player leaves a map in an item frame and views a clone of it, the green pointer will remain in the spot of the framed copy. This can be used to set up waypoints. Unexplored areas are transparent, making the item frame visible.

When the player leaves the area shown on a specific map, the player pointer will transform into a white dot on that map. The marker will shrink to a smaller white dot if the player is very far from the map’s center: the radius is 320 blocks per level of zoom. The dot will move along the edge of the map to show the relative location of the player.

While maps in the Nether work, all that will be shown is a red and gray pattern. The only useful function is finding where the player is in relation to where the map was made (the center), or have placed framed maps (green pointers). Additionally, the player pointer rapidly spins and is not a good indicator of direction.

Each pixel of a map corresponds to a variably-sized area of the world, and is always aligned to X and Z coordinates that are multiples of 8. Generally, the color of a map pixel matches the color of the most common opaque block in the corresponding area, as seen from the sky. ‘Minority blocks’ in the target area have no effect on the color of the pixel, thus small features tend to be undetectable on zoomed-out maps.

Maps will also show ground up to about 15 blocks below the surface of the water in oceans as slightly lighter blue, so you can see where the ground rises. This is not true with land above water. Higher elevations in the world mean lighter colors on the map. The map will record the surface even as you move below the surface.

Some relevant distances: 128 blocks (8 chunks) is the update radius from a player in the overworld. However, it is half this (64 blocks) in the End and the Nether. Also, 1024 blocks is the minimum Overworld distance from a Nether Portal, at which you can build another portal and expect to reach a new location in the Nether. This is the distance across a 1:8 map, and also from a 1:16 map’s center to its edge.

In Bedrock Edition, a map can be crafted with or without this marker, and a map without a position marker can add one later by adding a compass to the map. When a map is crafted without a compass, it’s simply called an "empty map", but when crafted with a compass, it’s called an "empty locator map".

Prior to this update, the Minecraft sun rose in the North, which threw off many players and led to a common misconception that Minecraft maps/worlds were oriented with East at the top. The sun now rises in the east and sets in the west, making navigation much more intuitive.

Before the change in sun position, it was commonly said that Minecraft maps/worlds are oriented with East at the top; sunrise, by definition, occurs at the East, which means it is certainly true that the maps were oriented "East" since the Sun rose from the top (North). However, Jeb asserted (and Notch agreed) that the Sun rose in the north. [3] [4] Most mods and map-making tools, however, used the terms East and North consistent with their actual definitions (e.g. a Cartograph-generated map with North at the top is rotated 90 degrees from the in-game map).

Crafting a map now creates an empty map. The map will be drawn for the first time when it is held and right clicked, and will be centered near the location of the player when clicked (not as before where it was centered on the location it was crafted.)

Notch said that he would try to make maps place-able on walls. [5] This feature was added with the addition of the item frame, making it possible to place maps on the wall. When placing a map into a item frame, the map will be shown and a green pointer will be placed at the location of the item frame.

New maps are crafted at a scale factor of 1:1. A zoomed in map can be zoomed out by re-crafting it with another 8 sheets of paper on a crafting table. Each time this is done, the scale increases – 1:1, 1:2, 1:4, 1:8, 1:16 with a map scale of 1:16 being the current maximum.

• A map created using / give can be any map by using the data parameter to specify the map number desired. If no data value is supplied it will default to map_x", where x is the number of the map. The first one will be map_0. If Map_0 has not ever been crafted, it will be centered on x0 z0.

• If the damage value is larger than the numbers of maps created then it will give you a 1:8 map in that area (which used to be the default map in previous updates). E.g. / give [player] minecraft:filled_map 1 100 assuming that you have not already exceeded 100 maps it will give you a default map.

• The maps are stored separately as their own data ( .dat) file as map_x.dat with (x) being the map number, see map item format for more info. By manipulating this number, players can organize their maps to suit them, or if they accidentally create a map in the same location, they can delete their extra map so as to save the number they make.