Matt zubick – cari’s newly appointed chair – is focused on helping members navigate the transition back to domestic self-sufficiency electricity for refrigeration heating and air conditioning answer key

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"Each scrapyard owner, at least for the independents like ourselves, runs into problems and you try to come up with solutions, and you do your best to do that," he says. "But I guarantee there are other people that have run into the same problem. grade 9 electricity So, there’s a collective knowledge out there and we’re trying to encourage people in the industry to talk more."

Currently, the organization is working on a range of ongoing issues. electricity png One is metal theft. gas jobs crna In the September edition of Recycling Product News, Zubick’s CARI colleague, and the organization’s communications manager, Marie Binette, contributed an article on the current state of metal theft in the recycling industry in which she emphasizes that the focus needs to be on thieves, not recyclers. Binette’s article pointed specifically to the case of Hydro One, Canada’s largest electricity provider, which has had great success implementing strategies that do not focus on recyclers, such as properly securing materials normally targeted by thieves, increasing penalties for perpetrators of metal theft and allocating appropriate law enforcement resources.

He says, in the case of Hydro One, the company has really taken a proactive approach to this issue. gas to liquid They host an annual metals theft seminar that brings together different parties affected by metals theft, such as other utility provides, law enforcement, first responders and recyclers. "The seminar allows all parties to present the unique way that crime affects their industry and it boosts communication and problem solving."

Being involved in the development of stewardship programs is another industry issue at the top of CARI’s agenda, and one which is changing rapidly in Ontario and across Canada. la gas Zubick says the challenge has long been to change the way stewardship programs are developed, often without consultation and insight coming directly from the industry, via CARI and other industry professionals.

"We’re recycling professionally already," says Zubick. "We already have established procedures and markets. v gashi 2013 We have a nationwide presence. Any program that is going to focus on recycling a particular material should at least be discussed with us, because we might already have a solution without them having to recreate a whole infrastructure."

The dissolution of the Ontario Tire Stewardship program this year, an organization that has done an effective job managing the province’s tires for many years, but which is being replaced with a brand-new organization and infrastructure for the management of scrap tires, is another case in point. "It is unfortunate," Zubick says. "With ripples in a stewardship program, it makes it an unsure market and that makes it complicated."

Zubick adds that U.S. tariffs are currently another one of their largest concerns. "The U.S. is our largest trading partner and the economy there affects a lot of Canadian recyclers," he says. "So, we are trying to communicate, we are working with ISRI [the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries] on it, and just waiting to see where things are going to settle out. It’s just the uncertainty of it."

Zubick, however, is an optimist at heart. When asked about his overall perspective regarding the global changes that have affected the recycling industry over the last year, particularly with the disappearance of China as a reliable end market, combined with the restructuring of trade agreements in North America, he does not see any of it as a threat to the Canadian recycling industry – just opportunity.

"As for the Chinese market, in my personal opinion, I think we’re going to have to find our way without China in the game. Companies have been using China for too long as a catch-all for all recycling needs. Having them out of the equation means that we’re going to have to find domestic solutions to make sure that items are recycled responsibly.