Mazda names americas head akira marumo next ceo electricity 101 powerpoint

To bolster its U.S. business, Mazda will jointly build a new assembly plant with Toyota Motor Corp. in Alabama to manufacture a new crossover. Production at the new plant, planned for 2021, will enable Mazda to eventually sell 2 million vehicles globally, from 1.66 million expected this year.

And despite partnering with Toyota, in a deal through which the companies took stakes in each other, Mazda remains a follower in fields such as electrification and autonomous driving. The carmaker is now part of a Toyota-led alliance to develop electric vehicle platforms, but the consortium has yet to announce any concrete outcomes.

The push kicks off in 2019 with a new vehicle architecture that will simplify manufacturing by underpinning nearly every vehicle in Mazda’s lineup, from the CX-9 large crossover to possibly the Mazda2 subcompact hatchback. The architecture will weigh less, cost less and deliver a quieter ride with crisper handling and better rigidity.

Also in 2019, the carmaker will launch a new generation of its Mazda Connect on-the-go infotainment system. The company isn’t providing details about it but hints at something akin to ride-hailing. Mazda is calling it a "new business model that enables car owners to support the needs of people in depopulated areas and those who have difficulty getting around."

TOKYO — Mazda Motor named Americas chief Akira Marumoto its new CEO as the second-tier Japanese carmaker — with its limited r&d budget and reliance on old-school combustion engines — confronts big challenges in the new era of electrification, autonomous driving and connected cars.

Marumoto, 60, currently Mazda’s executive vice president, will take office June 26, pending approval at the company’s annual shareholders’ meeting that month, the company said in a Friday news release. He takes the baton from Masamichi Kogai, 63, the production specialist who steered Mazda into its latest generation of products. Kogai will become chairman.

Kogai, who has led as president and CEO since 2013, piloted the Hiroshima-based carmaker through a complicated transition to a new crop of Skyactiv vehicles with lightweight, sportier platforms and more fuel efficient direct-injection engines. The production specialist also oversaw the transformation of the factories to a more flexible, cost-saving assembly system.

And despite partnering with Toyota Motor Corp. last year, in a deal through which the companies took stakes in each other, Mazda remains a follower in fields such as electrification and autonomous driving. The carmaker is now part of a Toyota-led alliance to develop electric vehicle platforms, but the consortium has yet to announce any concrete outcomes.

The push kicks off in 2019 with a new vehicle architecture that will simplify manufacturing by underpinning nearly every vehicle in Mazda’s lineup, from the CX-9 large crossover to possibly the Mazda2 subcompact hatchback. The architecture will weigh less, cost less and deliver a quieter ride with crisper handling and better rigidity.

Also in 2019, the carmaker will launch a new generation of its Mazda Connect on-the-go infotainment system. The company isn’t providing details about it but hints at something akin to ride-hailing. Mazda is calling it a "new business model that enables car owners to support the needs of people in depopulated areas and those who have difficulty getting around."